Abstract

The spectral reflectance characteristics of cirrostratus, cirrus clouds, and a jet contrail, in the 0.68–2.4-μ spectral interval, are of interest for remote sensing of cloud types from orbiting satellites. Measurements made with a down-looking spectrometer from a high altitude aircraft show differences between the signatures of naturally formed ice clouds, a fresh jet contrail, and a snow covered surface.

© 1970 Optical Society of America

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References

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1968 (2)

1967 (2)

1966 (2)

1958 (1)

N. Ockman, Advan. Phys. 7, 199 (1958).
[CrossRef]

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Reflectance of a cirrus deck at 12.80 km.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Comparison of cirrus vs stratus cloud reflectance.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Reflectance of a cirrostratus deck at 8.20 km.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Reflectance of snow covered fields.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Comparison of cirrostratus vs snow covered field reflectance.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Reflectance of a jet aircraft contrail.

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