Abstract

A laminar flow burner is described that provides several advantages in atomic absorption flame photometry. Included in its design is a heated spray chamber followed by a condensing system. This combination improves the concentration level of the analyte in the flame and keeps solvent concentration low. Therefore, sensitivities are significantly improved for most elements relative to cold chamber burners. The burner also contains several safety features. These various design features are discussed in detail, and performance data are given on (a) signal size, (b) signal-to-noise ratio, (c) linearity, (d) working range, (e) precision, and (g) accuracy.

© 1968 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. A. Hell, “Advanced Laminar Flow Burner for Atomic Absorption,” 5th Australian Spectroscopy Conference, Perth, June (1965).
  2. Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 20–24, 46–51, 88–91, 113–116 (1966); Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 24–27, 40–43, 69–72, 82–87, 102–105 (1967).
  3. J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
    [CrossRef]
  4. J. Ramírez-Munoz, Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 54 (1967).
  5. J. Ramírez-Munoz, W. F. Ulrich, Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 33 (1966).
  6. J. Ramírez-Munoz, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1968).
  7. J. Ramírez-Munoz, Talanta 13, 87 (1966).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
    [CrossRef]
  9. N. Shifrin, J. Ramírez-Munoz, Appl. Spectrosc. 22,July–Aug. (1968).

1968 (1)

N. Shifrin, J. Ramírez-Munoz, Appl. Spectrosc. 22,July–Aug. (1968).

1967 (1)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 54 (1967).

1966 (5)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, W. F. Ulrich, Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 33 (1966).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Talanta 13, 87 (1966).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 20–24, 46–51, 88–91, 113–116 (1966); Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 24–27, 40–43, 69–72, 82–87, 102–105 (1967).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Aime, C. P.

J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Hell, A.

J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
[CrossRef]

A. Hell, “Advanced Laminar Flow Burner for Atomic Absorption,” 5th Australian Spectroscopy Conference, Perth, June (1965).

Malakoff, J. L.

J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Ramírez-Munoz, J.

N. Shifrin, J. Ramírez-Munoz, Appl. Spectrosc. 22,July–Aug. (1968).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 54 (1967).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
[CrossRef]

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Talanta 13, 87 (1966).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

J. Ramírez-Munoz, W. F. Ulrich, Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 33 (1966).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
[CrossRef]

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1968).

Shifrin, N.

N. Shifrin, J. Ramírez-Munoz, Appl. Spectrosc. 22,July–Aug. (1968).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Ulrich, W. F.

J. Ramírez-Munoz, W. F. Ulrich, Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 33 (1966).

Anal. Chim. Acta (1)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, J. L. Malakoff, C. P. Aime, Anal. Chim. Acta 36, 328 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Spectrosc. (1)

N. Shifrin, J. Ramírez-Munoz, Appl. Spectrosc. 22,July–Aug. (1968).

Flame Notes, Beckman (3)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 54 (1967).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, W. F. Ulrich, Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 33 (1966).

Flame Notes, Beckman 1, 20–24, 46–51, 88–91, 113–116 (1966); Flame Notes, Beckman 2, 24–27, 40–43, 69–72, 82–87, 102–105 (1967).

Microchem. J. (1)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, N. Shifrin, A. Hell, Microchem. J. 11, 204 (1966).
[CrossRef]

Talanta (1)

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Talanta 13, 87 (1966).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Other (2)

A. Hell, “Advanced Laminar Flow Burner for Atomic Absorption,” 5th Australian Spectroscopy Conference, Perth, June (1965).

J. Ramírez-Munoz, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1968).

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Figures (8)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Diagram of the burner system with radiation-heated spray chamber and condenser.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Efficiency of spray chambers for magnesium with and without radiation transmitting walls using the same heater. The Pyrex wall or radiation type chamber reduces drift and improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of three over the metal wall or conduction type chamber.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Generation of fine sample aerosol with the heated spray chamber–condenser system. The graph shows the reduction of apparent absorption and scattering of light passing through the sample aerosol during chamber warmup, but with no flame burning.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Experimental nitrous oxide–acetylene slot assembly after 15 min operation with a fuel-rich flame. Slot assembly is same as that described in text except that top rims are machined differently in the region designated. (A) The front edge of the dot has a sharp rim, generated by a groove along the edge which prevented the formation of deposits. Thus, the shiny inner surface of small deposits at the rear edge, which has a broader rim, can be seen. (B) The top surface is flat on both sides of the slot. Strong deposits have formed on both edges of the slot. The velvetlike black outer surface of the deposits at the front edge can be seen. (C) Typical carbon tree formation from (B). The specimen to the left, depicting the surface exposed to the flame, has the shiny, metallic appearance of graphite. The cross section to the right demonstrates the transition from the graphite of the inner surface to the amorphous acetylene black of the outer surface.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Burner, with heated spray chamber and condenser, uncovered and operated with the nitrous oxide–acetylene flame.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Calibration curves for calcium, chromium, copper, iron, magnesium, and manganese; hot operation, single pass.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Log–log calibration curves for calcium.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Flame profiles of 1-ppm iron in aqueous and MIBK solutions.

Tables (5)

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Table I Concentration Limits; Hot Operation, Single Pass

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Table II Concentration Limits; Triple-Pass, Cold Operation

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Table III Repeatability

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Table IV Recovery. Quantitative Mg Determinations

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Table V Quantitative Determinations in Steel Samples (Rot Operation)

Metrics