Abstract

The geometric-optical principles of a solar simulator for 1.5-m diam test objects are described and discussed. The characteristic features of the optical arrangement are a special configuration of nine individual radiation sources, and a mosaic mirror, consisting of more than 1000 single mirrors. The mosaic mirror permits the reference plane (rated diameter 1.5 m) to be evenly illuminated by well collimated light. For lesser demands with regard to uniformity and collimation the mosaic mirror can be readjusted so as to serve larger or smaller test objects (the latter refers, for instance, to solar research satellites exposed to intense irradiation). The method of adjusting the mosaic mirror is described. A possible modification of the system for larger solar simulators is also discussed.

© 1968 Optical Society of America

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Figures (11)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Basic beam path.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Optical layout of space environment chamber.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Formation of secondary source by bundling primary sources. Method a.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Method b.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Unfolded beam path.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Graphical method for obtaining uniform illumination.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Eliminating irregularities of illumination.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

The secondary source.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Mosaic mirror composed of more than 1000 elements.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Back of the mosaic mirror showing individual aligning devices.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Proposal for a larger sun simulator with increased number of lamps.

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