Abstract

Out-of-focus images tend to move and split when obstructions are passed through or near the nodal planes of the image forming lens, while in-focus images do not show such effects. Geometrical optics is used to produce a qualitative explanation of these effects with the object of utilizing them for automatic focusing and rangefinding devices. Several problems in such devices are briefly discussed and a proposed automatic rangefinder is described.

© 1967 Optical Society of America

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Diagram illustrating the Scheiner principle.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Graphical construction of images formed by thin lenses (ray trace).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

A set of three ray trace cones with a noncircular aperture and three focus screen positions. (a) (b) out-of-focus images of a source point, and (c) out-of-focus image beyond in-focus points.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Close-distance range finder—environmental motion independent. * Circuitry for signal generation.

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