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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Photograph of National Bureau of Standards (looking southeast), made by William F. Meggers in 1919 on Cramer Spectrum Process Plate, from a Curtis training plane at 305 m. Note: Industrial Laboratory in lower left corner (interior still unfinished) and a country store with gas station just above (at intersection of Connecticut Avenue and Van Ness Street). There are few automobiles on grounds or streets; and absolutely no car parking areas. The cultivated area just above center represents the victory gardens of patriotic workers during and following World War I. There is no Tilden Street west of Connecticut Avenue.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Interior view of the standard vault at NBS in which the standards of length and mass of the U.S. were kept until 1966 when the standards were moved to the Gaithersburg site. Lyman J. Briggs, former director of the Bureau, is shown holding the national standard of length, meter bar No. 27. The national standard of mass, kilogram no. 20, is under double bell jars on the center of the second shelf from the top in the case. Both of these standards are made of an alloy of platinum and indium. They were supplied to this country by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

E. U. Condon of the University of Colorado (left, seated) confers with (from left to right): S. J. Smith NBSJILA; B. L. Moiseiwitsh Queen’s University of Belfast, and L. J. Kieffer NBSJILA about the critical review on electron impact excitation of atoms.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Lewis M. Branscomb, former director of JILA.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

The Boulder Laboratories of the NBS are shown in this photograph. They house the NBS Radio Standards Laboratory and Cryogenics Division as well as the Central Radio Propagation Laboratory, now part of ESSA.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

The National Physical Laboratory in 1927, during the decade when A Dictionary of Applied Physics, edited by Sir Richard Glazebrook, director of NPL, was being published. Its contributors included NBS people.

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