Abstract

The early history of the establishment of the National Bureau of Standards and of its work in optics is surveyed, as evidenced by its publications appearing in the period 1901โ€“1925.

© 1967 Optical Society of America

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Figures (8)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

The payroll of the National Bureau of Standards for a two-week period of November 1902.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

An early thermometer testing laboratory at NBS, with A. T. Pinkowsky and H. C. Dickinson.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Members of the International Technical Committee of 1910 and their assistants, meeting at the National Bureau of Standards to determine experimentally the electromotive force of the Weston Normal Cell: F. Laporte France (left), Sir Frank Smith England, F. A. Wolff, W. Jaeger Germany, M. P. Shoemaker, S. W. Stratton director NBS, F. Wenner, A. S. McDaniel, G. E. Post, F. W. Grover, E. B. Rosa, and G. W. Vinal.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

W. F. Meggers positions the eyepiece of the optical train prior to observation of the circular interference fringes of green light from the electrodeless Hg 198 lamp (left foreground). Length measurements based on this interference pattern can be made with an accuracy of 1 part in 108.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

W. W. Coblentz, chief of the Radiometry Section, Division 4, 119 South Building.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

An early photograph of W. F. Meggers (1888โ€“1966).

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

C. C. Crump and G. K. Burgess examining a blank made at the Bureau for a 70 in. reflecting telescope. When made (1928), this was the largest disk of optical glass constructed in this country.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Lyman J. Briggs, director of NBS 1933-1945, and I. C. Gardner, author of this article, with the telescope used in the eclipse expeditions in 1936 and 1937.

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