Abstract

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a promising alternative to sulfur hexafluoride for high-voltage circuit breaker applications. It is important to have a detailed understanding of CO2 arc properties. In this paper, radial temperature distribution of the free burning direct current arc in pure CO2 was investigated. Optical emission spectrometry was applied under different pressures (0.5 atm, 1 atm, and 1.5 atm) and at different axial positions (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm above the cathode). Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, the Fowler–Milne method was adopted for O I 715.67 nm and O I 777.19 nm in the periphery of the arc, and the single-line method was adopted for C II 657.81 nm near the center of the arc. Radial temperature profiles obtained by these two methods were combined at the position where normal temperature was assigned. The results indicate that near the center of the arc, higher pressure would lead to lower temperature; as the distance from the cathode to the position measured increases, the maximum temperature in the arc center would decrease. In addition, the temperature would decrease more sharply toward the periphery if the central temperature of the arc is higher.

© 2018 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (10)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription