Abstract

An artificial nose system for the recognition and classification of gas-phase analytes and its application in identifying common industrial gases is reported. The sensing mechanism of the device comprises the measurement of infrared absorption of volatile analytes inside the hollow cores of optofluidic Bragg fibers. An array of six fibers is used, where each fiber targets a different region of the mid-infrared in the range of 2–14 μm with transmission bandwidths of about 1–3 μm. The quenching in the transmission of each fiber due to the presence of analyte molecules in the hollow core is measured separately and the cross response of the array allows the identification of virtually any volatile organic compound (VOC). The device was used for the identification of seven industrial VOC vapors with high selectivity using a standard blackbody source and an infrared detector. The array response is registered as a unique six digit binary code for each analyte by assigning a threshold value to the fiber transmissions. The developed prototype is a comprehensive and versatile artificial nose that is applicable to a wide range of analytes.

© 2016 Optical Society of America

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