Abstract

There have been a handful of optical designs published that correct all of the third- and fifth-order ray aberrations without aspherical elements. These published designs have a minimum of six elements. Presented here are designs with only four and five elements. The performance of the designs and their practical utility are discussed.

© 2013 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. D. Shafer, “I plead the fifth,” Proc. SPIE 1049, 11–16(1989).
    [CrossRef]
  2. D. Shafer, “Design challenges for the 1990’s,” Proc. SPIE 1354, 608–616 (1991).
    [CrossRef]
  3. D. Shafer, “Tight fit—cramming a lot of information through a small volume,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at theIODC Conference (2010).
  4. D. Shafer, “Six-element lens corrected for all the 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).
  5. D. Shafer, “Lens corrected to zero for all 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1994) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).
  6. J. Sasian, “Theory of sixth-order wave aberrations,” Appl. Opt. 49, D69–D95 (2010).
    [CrossRef]
  7. M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 45.
  8. M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 81.
  9. R. Juergens, “The sample problem: a comparative study of lens design programs and users,” Proc. SPIE 237, 348–362 (1980).
    [CrossRef]

2010 (1)

1991 (1)

D. Shafer, “Design challenges for the 1990’s,” Proc. SPIE 1354, 608–616 (1991).
[CrossRef]

1989 (1)

D. Shafer, “I plead the fifth,” Proc. SPIE 1049, 11–16(1989).
[CrossRef]

1980 (1)

R. Juergens, “The sample problem: a comparative study of lens design programs and users,” Proc. SPIE 237, 348–362 (1980).
[CrossRef]

Juergens, R.

R. Juergens, “The sample problem: a comparative study of lens design programs and users,” Proc. SPIE 237, 348–362 (1980).
[CrossRef]

Kidger, M.

M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 45.

M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 81.

Sasian, J.

Shafer, D.

D. Shafer, “Design challenges for the 1990’s,” Proc. SPIE 1354, 608–616 (1991).
[CrossRef]

D. Shafer, “I plead the fifth,” Proc. SPIE 1049, 11–16(1989).
[CrossRef]

D. Shafer, “Tight fit—cramming a lot of information through a small volume,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at theIODC Conference (2010).

D. Shafer, “Six-element lens corrected for all the 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).

D. Shafer, “Lens corrected to zero for all 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1994) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).

Appl. Opt. (1)

Proc. SPIE (3)

R. Juergens, “The sample problem: a comparative study of lens design programs and users,” Proc. SPIE 237, 348–362 (1980).
[CrossRef]

D. Shafer, “I plead the fifth,” Proc. SPIE 1049, 11–16(1989).
[CrossRef]

D. Shafer, “Design challenges for the 1990’s,” Proc. SPIE 1354, 608–616 (1991).
[CrossRef]

Other (5)

D. Shafer, “Tight fit—cramming a lot of information through a small volume,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at theIODC Conference (2010).

D. Shafer, “Six-element lens corrected for all the 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1992) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).

D. Shafer, “Lens corrected to zero for all 3rd and 5th-order aberrations,” Optical Design Papers of David Shafer, thumb drive collection (1994) distributed at the IODC Conference (2010).

M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 45.

M. Kidger, Intermediate Optical Design (SPIE, 2004), p. 81.

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Figures (15)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Five-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Five-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Five-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig.
                                                  4.
Fig. 4.

Five-element achromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Four-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig. 6.
Fig. 6.

Four-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations.

Fig. 7.
Fig. 7.

Field flattener contribution to total third-order aberration for the various designs.

Fig. 8.
Fig. 8.

Field flattener contribution to total fifth-order aberration for the various designs.

Fig. 9.
Fig. 9.

Thin air gap contribution to total third-order aberration for the various designs.

Fig. 10.
Fig. 10.

Thin air gap contribution to total fifth-order aberration for the various designs.

Fig. 11.
Fig. 11.

Five-element monochromatic design corrected for all third- and fifth-order aberrations. Difference between high and low refractive indices is only 0.008.

Fig. 12.
Fig. 12.

Optimized double Gauss.

Fig.
                                                  13.
Fig. 13.

Six-element design based on Fig. 1 design, corrected for real rays.

Fig.
                                                  14.
Fig. 14.

Four-element design based on Fig. 4 design, optimized for real rays.

Fig.
                                                  15.
Fig. 15.

RMS spot radius of designs optimized with real rays.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1. Prescription for Fig. 4 Design

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