Abstract

Techniques used to produce aspheric and other irregular curves are described in this article. Although the machinery is not unique, the manner in which it is applied is felt to be unusual. Typical of the many challenging jobs this company has produced was the grinding and polishing of numerous massive radiation-shielding windows. These windows had a density of 3.2. Their physical dimensions were 2.1 m by 2.6 m by 125 mm thick. The weight of these windows was 1915 kg. A description of the equipment and techniques used will be given in a future article.

© 1966 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Drawing of glass master.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Meter bar and template.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Drawing of steps in glass removal.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Template adapted to spherical generator.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Drawing of two rough-ground curves.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Nonsymmetrical optical component.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Polishing setup for nonsymetrical optics.

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