Abstract

The increased demand for aspheric surfaces in optical systems has required refinements and advances in optical shop technology. Air gauges have been used to measure aspheric surfaces in prepolished and polished conditions to accuracies on the order of one wavelength of visible light. Small, synchronously driven laps have been used in the polishing and figuring of aspheric surfaces with good results regarding speed, accuracy, and smoothness. Both techniques provide interesting possibilities for future development.

© 1966 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. F. Twyman, Prism and Lens Making (Hilger & Watts Ltd., London, 1952), pp. 251–277, 323–421.
  2. B. Rosett, Goddard Experiment Package Optical System (Kollsman Instrument Corporation, Long Island, New York, 1963).
  3. P. A. Valleli in Astronomical League Convention Proceedings, 1963 (Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston, Boston, 1963), p.71.
  4. R. R. Zeimer, Technical Specifications for the Goddard Experiment Package (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1961).
  5. H. B. Hallock, Appl. Opt. 1, 155 (1962).
    [CrossRef]
  6. J. Strong, Concepts of Classical Optics (W. H. Freeman & Company, San Francisco, 1958), pp. 294–300.
  7. E. H. Linfoot, Recent Advances in Optics (Oxford University Press, London, 1955), pp. 128–175.
  8. G. B. Thomas, Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Addison Wesley Publishing Co., Reading, Mass., 1956), pp. 403–407.
  9. D. V. Widder, Advanced Calculus (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1947), pp. 72–97.

1962

Hallock, H. B.

Linfoot, E. H.

E. H. Linfoot, Recent Advances in Optics (Oxford University Press, London, 1955), pp. 128–175.

Rosett, B.

B. Rosett, Goddard Experiment Package Optical System (Kollsman Instrument Corporation, Long Island, New York, 1963).

Strong, J.

J. Strong, Concepts of Classical Optics (W. H. Freeman & Company, San Francisco, 1958), pp. 294–300.

Thomas, G. B.

G. B. Thomas, Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Addison Wesley Publishing Co., Reading, Mass., 1956), pp. 403–407.

Twyman, F.

F. Twyman, Prism and Lens Making (Hilger & Watts Ltd., London, 1952), pp. 251–277, 323–421.

Valleli, P. A.

P. A. Valleli in Astronomical League Convention Proceedings, 1963 (Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston, Boston, 1963), p.71.

Widder, D. V.

D. V. Widder, Advanced Calculus (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1947), pp. 72–97.

Zeimer, R. R.

R. R. Zeimer, Technical Specifications for the Goddard Experiment Package (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1961).

Appl. Opt.

Other

F. Twyman, Prism and Lens Making (Hilger & Watts Ltd., London, 1952), pp. 251–277, 323–421.

B. Rosett, Goddard Experiment Package Optical System (Kollsman Instrument Corporation, Long Island, New York, 1963).

P. A. Valleli in Astronomical League Convention Proceedings, 1963 (Amateur Telescope Makers of Boston, Boston, 1963), p.71.

R. R. Zeimer, Technical Specifications for the Goddard Experiment Package (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 1961).

J. Strong, Concepts of Classical Optics (W. H. Freeman & Company, San Francisco, 1958), pp. 294–300.

E. H. Linfoot, Recent Advances in Optics (Oxford University Press, London, 1955), pp. 128–175.

G. B. Thomas, Calculus and Analytic Geometry (Addison Wesley Publishing Co., Reading, Mass., 1956), pp. 403–407.

D. V. Widder, Advanced Calculus (Prentice-Hall, Inc., New York, 1947), pp. 72–97.

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Graph showing the ideal aspheric deviation from a sphere through the center and edge of the surface being figured.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Photograph of an air gauge scanning setup for a 6.35-cm diam convex mirror. The mirror, about 25 μ aspheric, is the secondary for a 25.4-cm focal length f/2 modified Cassigrainian objective. Note the bridge work supporting the air gauge nozzle; the air gauge itself is to the right of the recorder.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Surface of revolution generated by x2 = f(z) rotating about the z axis. x1 is the point at which the curvature is being examined.

Equations (1)

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( x cos α - z sin α + x 1 ) 2 + y 2 = 4 ρ ( x sin α + z cos α + z 1 ) .

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