Abstract

Measurement techniques used in the optics workshop often are complex and demanding. Characteristics considered are flatness, parallelism, angularity, curvature, length, and surface quality. Types of measuring equipment common to the workshop and their relative accuracies are discussed. The present usage of the Kösters prism as a workshop measuring device is also discussed.

© 1966 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. MIL-O–13830A General Specification Governing the Manufacture, Assembly, and Inspection of Optical Components for Fire Control Instruments (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1963.)
  2. R. R. Brooks, V. Williams, Appl. Opt. 4, 325 (1965).
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1965 (1)

Appl. Opt. (1)

Other (1)

MIL-O–13830A General Specification Governing the Manufacture, Assembly, and Inspection of Optical Components for Fire Control Instruments (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1963.)

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Kösters prism interferometer optical diagram.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Optical diagram for parallelism measurements.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Interferometric autocollimator.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Curve-tracing apparatus.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Length measurement using digital readout equipment.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Differences in interpretation of scratch width.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table I Scratch Widths of Military Standards

Metrics