Abstract

We characterize the temporal response of fiber-optic components using a fiber-based frequency comb interferometer; measurements are compared and validated against a commercial instrument. The main advantage of the instrument lies in the absence of moving parts or a tunable laser, leading to very fast scanning. A measurement of a mechanical distortion, cycled at 130Hz, on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is presented. A complete profile of the mechanical distortion is taken every 2.5ms (400Hz scanning speed) and each “snapshot” is taken in 200μs. This scanning speed was arbitrarily chosen, and the instrument could be set to scan much faster, up to hundreds of kilohertz. With high-reflectivity FBGs, the same instrument could scan simultaneously the profile of 140 wavelength-multiplexed FBGs at 2kHz.

© 2010 Optical Society of America

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References

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    [CrossRef]
  5. A. Bartels, A. Thoma, C. Janke, T. Dekorsky, A. Dreyhaupt, S. Winnerl, and M. Helm, “High-resolution THz spectrometer with kHz scan rates,” Opt. Express 14, 430–437 (2006).
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2008 (2)

2006 (2)

A. Bartels, A. Thoma, C. Janke, T. Dekorsky, A. Dreyhaupt, S. Winnerl, and M. Helm, “High-resolution THz spectrometer with kHz scan rates,” Opt. Express 14, 430–437 (2006).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

2004 (1)

Araki, T.

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

Bartels, A.

Coddington, I.

I. Coddington, W. C. Swann, and N. R. Newbury, “Coherent multiheterodyne spectroscopy using stabilized optical frequency combs,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013902 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Dekorsky, T.

Deschênes, J.-D.

Dreyhaupt, A.

Forst, M.

Genest, J.

Giaccari, P.

Gohle, C.

Helm, M.

Holzwarth, R.

Janke, C.

Kabetani, Y.

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

Keilmann, F.

Kray, S.

Kurz, H.

Newbury, N. R.

I. Coddington, W. C. Swann, and N. R. Newbury, “Coherent multiheterodyne spectroscopy using stabilized optical frequency combs,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013902 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Saneyoshi, E.

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

Saucier, P.

Spoler, F.

Swann, W. C.

I. Coddington, W. C. Swann, and N. R. Newbury, “Coherent multiheterodyne spectroscopy using stabilized optical frequency combs,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 013902 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Thoma, A.

Tremblay, P.

Winnerl, S.

Yasui, T.

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

Yokoyama, S.

T. Yasui, Y. Kabetani, E. Saneyoshi, S. Yokoyama, and T. Araki, “Terahertz frequency comb by multifrequency-heterodyning photoconductive detection for high-accuracy, high-resolution terahertz spectroscopy,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 241104 (2006).
[CrossRef]

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Figures (7)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Experimental setup of the optical reflectometry measuring a fiber component. The setup is configured to use the referencing method proposed by Giaccari et al. [3]. All sections have the same optical delay.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Representations of interferograms produced by a (a) conventional two-beam interferometer and (b) comb interferometer. The comb interferogram is sampled by the pulses: the amplitude of each impulse response yields one point on the wanted interference pattern.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Schematic representation of the referencing method processing. The same signal conditioning is applied to signals D SAMP and D WB . Similarly, D REF 1 and D REF 2 undergo the same phase demodulation.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

(a) Amplitude of the cleaved fiber. (b) Amplitude of the cleaved fiber magnified between 15 and 15 mm , (c) between 2 and 2 mm , and (d) between 0.05 and 0.05 mm (d) of optical path difference. The optical path delay is adjusted to zero at the cleave location. The peak amplitude is adjusted to 0 dB for both measurements to compare the sensitivities and dynamic ranges.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Wideband beating spectrum of the lasers. The wavelength axis was computed from the correction parameters. The spatial resolution ( 16 μm ) is set by the spectral width of this beating ( 35 nm at 3 dB ). This signal is also used to remove the instrumental contributions from the sample measurement.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

(a) Amplitude and (b) phase deviation of the 8 cm FBG sample. Amplitudes are adjusted to 0 dB .

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Piezo is glued to an 8 cm uniform FBG sample. (a) The local period of the grating for 19 consecutive measurements with the piezo off is shown. The average local period of the 19 measurements was removed to show only deviations. (b) The local period of the grating for 19 consecutive measurements with the piezo oscillating at 130 Hz is shown. A moving average filter of length 4.3 mm was used to improve the SNR after the numerical derivative. The shape of the deviation of the local period due to stress and mechanical distortion is nonuniform.

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