Abstract

The minimum quantities of the nine most abundant, isolated, atmospheric gases that are detectable with a refractometer are calculated. An examination of the applicability of refractometric techniques for detecting and analyzing gaseous mixtures is discussed and a comparison made against other established techniques. Traditionally, most gas analysis performed with an interferometer is in determining the dispersion or refractivity of a known sample, presented here is the inverse approach, where refractivities are measured to determine the concentrations of particular species within a gas. The method, and experimental results for determining the minimum quantities of a particular species detectable in a mixture has been explored, as well as the complications, such as the indistinguishability of dynamic polarizabilities of different gases and the subsequent demands for accurate pressure and fringe measurements of using interferometric techniques. It is shown that the concentration of a single (isolated) gas, in units of number density, can be determined to within approximately 110×1018m3, and a mixture of the three most abundant gases, N2, O2 and Ar, to within 3.4×104partsin106(ppm) when a minimum detectable fringe shift of λ/100 is assumed.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Ultrasensitive spectral trace detection of individual molecular components in an atmospheric binary mixture

Neil D. Weston, Palanikumaran Sakthivel, and Pritish Mukherjee
Appl. Opt. 32(6) 828-835 (1993)

Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell

Hadj Elandaloussi, Christian Rouillé, Patrick Marie-Jeanne, and Christof Janssen
Appl. Opt. 55(8) 1971-1977 (2016)

Looking into the volcano with a Mid-IR DFB diode laser and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, L. Gianfrani, A. Salhi, Y. Rouillard, A. Ouvrard, and D. Romanini
Opt. Express 14(23) 11442-11452 (2006)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (4)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (5)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (13)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription