Abstract

Historic practice has been to optically monitor narrow bandpass filters by the termination of each layer at a turning point. The problem is that turning points are the least sensitive points to the change of the optical signal with thickness and, thereby, those points are most prone to errors. It is shown that better performance in the production results can be achieved by designing and monitoring in order to terminate layers at non-turning points. A further advantage has been discovered wherein nonoptical monitoring of some layers is used to achieve even better stability in the production result. Simulation programs have been applied to such designs and demonstrate the advantages as compared to the historical approach.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. H. A. Macleod, “Turning value monitoring of narrow-band all-dielectric thin-film optical filters,” Opt. Acta 19, 1-28 (1972).
    [CrossRef]
  2. P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
    [CrossRef]
  3. C. Schroedter, “Evaporation monitoring system featuring software trigger points and on-line evaluation of refractive indices,” Proc. SPIE 652, 15-20 (1986).
  4. R. R. Willey, “Monitoring thin films of the fence post design and its advantages for narrow bandpass filters,” Appl. Opt. 47, C147-C150 (2008).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. R. R. Willey, “Design and monitoring of narrow bandpass filters composed of non-quarter-wave thicknesses,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 710119 (2008).
    [CrossRef]
  6. A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
    [CrossRef]
  7. R. R. Willey and A. Zöller, “Computer simulation of monitoring of narrow bandpass filter sat non-turning points,” in 52nd Annual Technical Conference Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters (Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2009), paper O-7.

2008 (3)

R. R. Willey, “Design and monitoring of narrow bandpass filters composed of non-quarter-wave thicknesses,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 710119 (2008).
[CrossRef]

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

R. R. Willey, “Monitoring thin films of the fence post design and its advantages for narrow bandpass filters,” Appl. Opt. 47, C147-C150 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

1986 (1)

C. Schroedter, “Evaporation monitoring system featuring software trigger points and on-line evaluation of refractive indices,” Proc. SPIE 652, 15-20 (1986).

1972 (2)

H. A. Macleod, “Turning value monitoring of narrow-band all-dielectric thin-film optical filters,” Opt. Acta 19, 1-28 (1972).
[CrossRef]

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Boos, M.

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

Bousquet, P.

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Fornier, A.

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Hagedorn, H.

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

Kowalczyk, R.

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Macleod, H. A.

H. A. Macleod, “Turning value monitoring of narrow-band all-dielectric thin-film optical filters,” Opt. Acta 19, 1-28 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Pelletier, E.

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Roche, P.

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Romanov, B.

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

Schroedter, C.

C. Schroedter, “Evaporation monitoring system featuring software trigger points and on-line evaluation of refractive indices,” Proc. SPIE 652, 15-20 (1986).

Willey, R. R.

R. R. Willey, “Design and monitoring of narrow bandpass filters composed of non-quarter-wave thicknesses,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 710119 (2008).
[CrossRef]

R. R. Willey, “Monitoring thin films of the fence post design and its advantages for narrow bandpass filters,” Appl. Opt. 47, C147-C150 (2008).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

R. R. Willey and A. Zöller, “Computer simulation of monitoring of narrow bandpass filter sat non-turning points,” in 52nd Annual Technical Conference Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters (Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2009), paper O-7.

Zöller, A.

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

R. R. Willey and A. Zöller, “Computer simulation of monitoring of narrow bandpass filter sat non-turning points,” in 52nd Annual Technical Conference Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters (Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2009), paper O-7.

Appl. Opt. (1)

Opt. Acta (1)

H. A. Macleod, “Turning value monitoring of narrow-band all-dielectric thin-film optical filters,” Opt. Acta 19, 1-28 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Proc. SPIE (3)

C. Schroedter, “Evaporation monitoring system featuring software trigger points and on-line evaluation of refractive indices,” Proc. SPIE 652, 15-20 (1986).

R. R. Willey, “Design and monitoring of narrow bandpass filters composed of non-quarter-wave thicknesses,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 710119 (2008).
[CrossRef]

A. Zöller, M. Boos, H. Hagedorn, and B. Romanov, “Computer simulation of coating processes with monochromatic monitoring,” Proc. SPIE 7101, 71010G (2008).
[CrossRef]

Thin Solid Films (1)

P. Bousquet, A. Fornier, R. Kowalczyk, E. Pelletier, and P. Roche, “Optical filters: monitoring process allowing the auto-correction of thickness errors,” Thin Solid Films 13, 285-290 (1972).
[CrossRef]

Other (1)

R. R. Willey and A. Zöller, “Computer simulation of monitoring of narrow bandpass filter sat non-turning points,” in 52nd Annual Technical Conference Proceedings of the Society of Vacuum Coaters (Society of Vacuum Coaters, 2009), paper O-7.

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Figures (17)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Optical monitoring plot for two layers where the termination has been made after a 0.2%T change has been detected.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Spectral performance of the conventional 2 1 NBF.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Simulations of 10 runs of the conventional 2 1 NBF design with 0.1%T random errors in TP monitoring and 0% physical monitoring errors.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Spectral performance of the conventional 2 1 NBF with TP overshoots of 0.0%T to 1.1%T.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Spectral performance of the conventional 2 1 NBF with TP overshoots of 0.1%T and random errors of 0.1%T.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Spectral performance of the conventional 2 1 NBF with TP overshoots of 0.2%T and random errors of 0.1%T.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Spectral performance of the 4 1 NBF adjusted for non-TP monitoring.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Optical monitoring trace of a 4 1 design for non-turning-point layer terminations.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Simulations of 10 runs of the 2.67 1 NBF design with 0.1%T random errors in TP monitoring and 0% physical monitoring errors showing breakdowns in the process.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Simulations of 10 runs of the 3.2 1 NBF design with 0.1%T random errors in TP monitoring and 0% physical monitoring errors.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Simulations of 10 runs of the 3.2 1 NBF design with 0.3%T random errors in TP monitoring and 1% physical monitoring errors showing breakdowns in the process.

Fig. 12
Fig. 12

Simulations of 10 runs of the 4 1 NBF design with 0.1%T random errors in TP monitoring and 0% physical monitoring errors.

Fig. 13
Fig. 13

Simulations of 10 runs of the 4 1 NBF design with 0.3%T random errors in TP monitoring and 3% physical monitoring errors.

Fig. 14
Fig. 14

Simulation of hybrid non-TP monitoring for the 2.67 1 case with 2% physical and 0.2%T errors to be compared with Figs. 3, 9.

Fig. 15
Fig. 15

Simulation of hybrid non-TP monitoring for the 2.67 1 case with 3% physical and 0.3%T errors showing monitoring breakdown at these error levels.

Fig. 16
Fig. 16

Simulation of the 4 1 case with 1% physical and 0.1%T showing how well controlled it is.

Fig. 17
Fig. 17

Simulation of the 4 1 case with 4% physical and 0.5%T showing how extremely error tolerant the hybrid non-TP approach can be.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Summary of Properties of Different Designs and Layer Termination Methods a

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