Abstract

We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry–Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630   nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0 .3   parts in 109 and 16 parts in 1012 respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere.

© 2006 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Applying light-emitting diodes with narrowband emission features in differential spectroscopy

Holger Sihler, Christoph Kern, Denis Pöhler, and Ulrich Platt
Opt. Lett. 34(23) 3716-3718 (2009)

Nitrogen dioxide monitoring using a blue LED

Feng Xu, Zhe Lv, Xiutao Lou, Yungang Zhang, and Zhiguo Zhang
Appl. Opt. 47(29) 5337-5340 (2008)

Long optical cavities for open-path monitoring of atmospheric trace gases and aerosol extinction

Ravi M. Varma, Dean S. Venables, Albert A. Ruth, Uwe Heitmann, Eric Schlosser, and Sophie Dixneuf
Appl. Opt. 48(4) B159-B171 (2009)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (9)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (2)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (7)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription