Abstract

We report what we believe to be a novel backscattering phenomenon associated with localized optical intensity peaks (spanning as little as 43nm) arising at the shadow-side surfaces of plane-wave-illuminated dielectric microcylinders of noncircular cross sections. Namely, for nanometer-scale dielectric particles positioned within the localized intensity peaks, their backscattering of visible light is enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to the case of isolated nanoparticles (i.e., Rayleigh scattering). The positions of the localized intensity peaks can be quickly scanned along the microcylinder surface by changing either the incident wavelength or angle. This combination of giant backscattering enhancement of nanoparticles and ease and rapidity of scanning may present advantages relative to the use of fragile, mechanically scanned, near-field probes. Potential applications include visible-light detection, characterization, and manipulation of nanoparticles.

© 2006 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |
  • |
  • |

  1. M. A. Paesler and P. J. Moyer, Near-Field Optics: Theory, Instrumentation, and Applications (Wiley, 1996).
  2. J. F. Owen, R. K. Chang, and P. W. Barber, "Internal electric field distributions of a dielectric cylinder at resonance wavelengths," Opt. Lett. 6, 540-542 (1981).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. D. S. Benincasa, P. W. Barber, J.-Z. Zhang, W.-F. Hsieh, andR. K. Chang, "Spatial distribution of the internal and near-field intensities of large cylindrical and spherical scatters," Appl. Opt. 26, 1348-1356 (1987).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. X. Li, Z. Chen, A. Taflove, and V. Backman, "Optical analysis of nanoparticles via enhanced backscattering facilitated by 3D photonic nanojets," Opt. Express 13, 526-533 (2005).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. Z. Chen, A. Taflove, and V. Backman, "Concept of the equiphase sphere for light scattering by nonspherical dielectric particles," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 21, 88-97 (2004).
    [CrossRef]
  6. X. Li, Z. Chen, A. Taflove, and V. Backman, "Novel analytical techniques to address forward and inverse problems of light scattering by irregularly shaped particles," Opt. Lett. 29, 1239-1241 (2004).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. X. Li, Z. Chen, A. Taflove, and V. Backman, "Equiphase-sphere approximation for analysis of light scattering by arbitrarily-shaped nonspherical particles," Appl. Opt. 43, 4497-4505 (2004).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. A. Taflove and S. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method (Artech House, 2000).
  9. Z. Chen, A. Taflove, and V. Backman, "Photonic nanojet enhancement of backscattering of light by nanoparticles: a potential novel visible-light ultramicroscopy technique," Opt. Express 12, 1214-1220 (2004).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. J.-P. Berenger, "A perfectly matched layer for the absorption of electromagnetic waves," J. Comput. Phys. 114, 185-200 (1994).
    [CrossRef]
  11. S. M. Mansfield and G. S. Kino, "Solid immersion microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2615-2616 (1990).
    [CrossRef]
  12. B. Dunn, "Near-field scanning optical microscopy," Chem. Rev. 99, 2891-2928 (1999).
    [CrossRef]

2005 (1)

2004 (4)

1999 (1)

B. Dunn, "Near-field scanning optical microscopy," Chem. Rev. 99, 2891-2928 (1999).
[CrossRef]

1994 (1)

J.-P. Berenger, "A perfectly matched layer for the absorption of electromagnetic waves," J. Comput. Phys. 114, 185-200 (1994).
[CrossRef]

1990 (1)

S. M. Mansfield and G. S. Kino, "Solid immersion microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2615-2616 (1990).
[CrossRef]

1987 (1)

1981 (1)

Backman, V.

Barber, P. W.

Benincasa, D. S.

Berenger, J.-P.

J.-P. Berenger, "A perfectly matched layer for the absorption of electromagnetic waves," J. Comput. Phys. 114, 185-200 (1994).
[CrossRef]

Chang, R. K.

Chen, Z.

Dunn, B.

B. Dunn, "Near-field scanning optical microscopy," Chem. Rev. 99, 2891-2928 (1999).
[CrossRef]

Hagness, S.

A. Taflove and S. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method (Artech House, 2000).

Hsieh, W.-F.

Kino, G. S.

S. M. Mansfield and G. S. Kino, "Solid immersion microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2615-2616 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Li, X.

Mansfield, S. M.

S. M. Mansfield and G. S. Kino, "Solid immersion microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2615-2616 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Moyer, P. J.

M. A. Paesler and P. J. Moyer, Near-Field Optics: Theory, Instrumentation, and Applications (Wiley, 1996).

Owen, J. F.

Paesler, M. A.

M. A. Paesler and P. J. Moyer, Near-Field Optics: Theory, Instrumentation, and Applications (Wiley, 1996).

Taflove, A.

Zhang, J.-Z.

Appl. Opt. (2)

Appl. Phys. Lett. (1)

S. M. Mansfield and G. S. Kino, "Solid immersion microscope," Appl. Phys. Lett. 57, 2615-2616 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Chem. Rev. (1)

B. Dunn, "Near-field scanning optical microscopy," Chem. Rev. 99, 2891-2928 (1999).
[CrossRef]

J. Comput. Phys. (1)

J.-P. Berenger, "A perfectly matched layer for the absorption of electromagnetic waves," J. Comput. Phys. 114, 185-200 (1994).
[CrossRef]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. A (1)

Opt. Express (2)

Opt. Lett. (2)

Other (2)

M. A. Paesler and P. J. Moyer, Near-Field Optics: Theory, Instrumentation, and Applications (Wiley, 1996).

A. Taflove and S. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics: The Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method (Artech House, 2000).

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

(Color online) (a) Illustration of optical NIPs, marked by an arrow, at the shadow-side surface of a plane-wave-illuminated elliptical dielectric cylinder. The FDTD-calculated envelope of the sinusoidal steady-state intensity is visualized in linear scale. Light of wavelength λ = 500 nm propagates from left to right. (b) Expanded view of NIPs at the shadow-side surface of the cylinder in (a).

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

(Color online) (a) Illustration of optical NIPs, marked by an arrow, at the shadow-side surface of a plane-wave-illuminated triangular dielectric cylinder. The FDTD-calculated envelope of the sinusoidal steady-state intensity is visualized in linear scale. Light of wavelength λ = 500 nm propagates from left to right. (b) Expanded view of NIPs in (a).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

FDTD numerical results illustrating NIP-enhanced backscattering of light by dielectric nanoparticles. An n = 1.5 dielectric nanoparticle of dimension s is located at the center of the NIP at the surface of the cylinder shown in Fig. 1. (a) Absolute value of the change of the differential scattering cross section within ± 10 ° of the backscatter of the cylinder for s = 10 nm compared with the differential scattering cross section of the isolated nanoparticle. (b) Repeated studies of (a) for a nanoparticle of dimension s = 20 nm .

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

FDTD numerical results illustrating the backscattering enhancement factor as a function of dimension s of dielectric nanoparticles. An n = 1.5 dielectric nanoparticle of dimension s is inserted at the center of the NIP at the surface of the cylinder shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

(Color online) Effects of the perturbing incident wavelength and angle on locations of optical NIPs at the shadow-side surface of a plane-wave-illuminated elliptical cylinder. The FDTD-calculated envelope of the sinusoidal steady-state intensity is visualized. (a) The solid curve corresponds to the incident wavelength of 500 nm whereas the red curve corresponds to the incident wavelength of 525 nm . (b) The solid curve corresponds to the incident angle of 0°, whereas the red curve corresponds to the incident angle of 13°.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Effects of the perturbing incident wavelength and angle on locations of optical NIPs at the shadow-side surface of a plane-wave-illuminated elliptical cylinder. The relative location shift of a NIP is plotted. (a) Effects of perturbing incident wavelength on locations of NIPs. (b) Effects of perturbing incident angle on locations of NIPs.

Equations (5)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

σ d = r 2 I s / I i .
Δ k · Δ r π ,
Δ r π / Δ k = λ / 4 ,
Δσ = | σ m + n σ m | .
BEF = Δσ / σ n ,

Metrics