Abstract

Holographic displays employing binary phase modulation have been demonstrated to be attractive on the grounds of efficiency and miniaturization, and they offer a plausible approach to two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) image projection and display. A novel algorithm—one-step phase retrieval—and corresponding hardware architecture have recently been proposed, providing the performance required for real-time holographic display. However, since viewing angle varies inversely with pixel size, very small display pixels are required to achieve a wide field of view. This is particularly problematic for 3D displays, as the requirement for a large display with small pixels has hitherto necessitated an unachievably large electrical bandwidth. We present a novel approach, utilizing fixed random pixelated quaternary phase masks of greater resolution than the displayed hologram, to dramatically increase the viewing angle for 2D and 3D holographic displays without incurring a bandwidth penalty or significantly degrading image quality. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to generate holograms accounting for the presence of such a phase mask, so that only one mask is required.

© 2006 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.
  2. E. Buckley and A. J. Cable, "Holographic apparatus and method," UK patent application GB0329012.9, P36148WO (13 December 2004).
  3. A. G. Kirk and T. J. Hall, "Design of binary computer-generated holograms: coding density and reconstruction error," Opt. Commun. 94, 491-496 (1992).
    [CrossRef]
  4. T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
    [CrossRef]
  5. N. C. Gallagher, Jr., "Optimum quantization in digital holography," Appl. Opt. 17, 109-115 (1978).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1994 (1)

T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
[CrossRef]

1992 (1)

A. G. Kirk and T. J. Hall, "Design of binary computer-generated holograms: coding density and reconstruction error," Opt. Commun. 94, 491-496 (1992).
[CrossRef]

1978 (1)

Buckley, E.

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Cable, A. J.

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Crossland, W. A.

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Gallagher, N. C.

Hall, T. J.

A. G. Kirk and T. J. Hall, "Design of binary computer-generated holograms: coding density and reconstruction error," Opt. Commun. 94, 491-496 (1992).
[CrossRef]

Kirk, A. G.

A. G. Kirk and T. J. Hall, "Design of binary computer-generated holograms: coding density and reconstruction error," Opt. Commun. 94, 491-496 (1992).
[CrossRef]

Lawrence, N. A.

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Mash, P.

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Mears, R. J.

T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
[CrossRef]

O'Brien, D. C.

T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
[CrossRef]

Wilkinson, T. D.

T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
[CrossRef]

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

Appl. Opt. (1)

Opt. Commun. (2)

A. G. Kirk and T. J. Hall, "Design of binary computer-generated holograms: coding density and reconstruction error," Opt. Commun. 94, 491-496 (1992).
[CrossRef]

T. D. Wilkinson, D. C. O'Brien, and R. J. Mears, "Dynamic asymmetric binary holograms using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator," Opt. Commun. 109, 222-226 (1994).
[CrossRef]

Other (2)

A. J. Cable, E. Buckley, P. Mash, N. A. Lawrence, T. D. Wilkinson, and W. A. Crossland, "Real-time binary hologram generation for high-quality video projection applications," in SID 04 Digest, (Society for Information Display, 2004), Vol. 53.1, pp. 1-3.

E. Buckley and A. J. Cable, "Holographic apparatus and method," UK patent application GB0329012.9, P36148WO (13 December 2004).

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Figures (10)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Effective phase pattern formed by hologram and phase-mask pixels when aligned and placed in close contact: (a) hologram pattern h uv , (b) phase-mask pattern p uv , (c) effective pattern p uv h uv .

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

RPFs resulting from (a) a binary phase hologram h u v and (b) a phase mask and hologram combination h u v p u v .

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Effect of (a) hologram resolution and (b) number of on pixels upon RPF SNR, with and without a phase mask.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Simulated RPFs produced by 256 × 256 holograms (a) without and (b) with a 512 × 512 phase mask.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

SNR variation with a resolution of [ 0 , π ] phase mask employed in conjunction with 256 × 256 pixel holograms.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

(a) Simulated and (b) measured performance of a 512 × 512 pixel hologram used with a 1024 × 1024 pixel phase mask to double the viewing angle.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

SNR degradation caused by use of different types of phase mask. Case 1, no phase mask; case 2, conjugate image removal using a [ 0 , π / 2 ] phase mask; case 3, [ 0 , π ] superresolution phase mask used to double the viewing angle; case 4, conjugate image removal and viewing angle doubling using a quaternary [ 0 , π / 2 , π , 3 π / 2 ] phase mask.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

SNR variation with various hologram and phase-mask resolutions for a RPF with 500 on pixels.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Simulated RPFs produced by OSPR Algorithm 1 using a quaternary phase mask for different numbers of hologram subframes N.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Simulated RPFs generated from (a) 1024 × 1024 hologram with 4096 × 4096 random quaternary phase mask and (b) true 4096 × 4096 hologram.

Equations (3)

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θ = 2 arctan λ 2 Δ .
lim α { | α + g u v ( n ) | α + { g u v ( n ) } } = 1 ;
m u v ( n ) = α + { g u v ( n ) } .

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