Abstract

An airborne system for fast measurements of spectral actinic flux densities in the wavelength range 305–700 nm is introduced. The system is called the Actinic Flux Density Meter (AFDM). The AFDM utilizes the diode array technique and measures downwelling and upwelling spectral actinic flux densities separately with a time resolution of less than 1 s. For airborne measurements this means a spatial resolution of ~ 60 m, assuming an average aircraft velocity of 60 m/s. Thus the AFDM resolves fast changes in the actinic radiation field, which are of special importance for conditions of inhomogeneous clouds or surface reflection. Laboratory characterization measurements of the AFDM are presented, and a method to correct the nonideal angular response of the optical inlets is introduced. Furthermore, exemplar field data sampled simultaneously with spectral irradiance measurements are shown. The horizontal variability of the measured spectra of actinic flux density is quantified, and profile measurements for overcast situations are presented. Finally, the effects of clouds on the spectral actinic flux density are discussed.

© 2005 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Solar actinic flux spectroradiometry: a technique for measuring photolysis frequencies in the atmosphere

Andreas Hofzumahaus, Alexander Kraus, and Martin Müller
Appl. Opt. 38(21) 4443-4460 (1999)

Retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters from airborne flux measurements: application to the atmospheric correction of imagery

N. T. O’Neill, A. Royer, Q. F. Xu, and P. M. Teillet
Appl. Opt. 36(3) 662-674 (1997)

Downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions sampled under cloudless conditions in Antarctica

Raul R. Cordero, Alessandro Damiani, Jorge Ferrer, Juan Rayas, Jose Jorquera, Mario Tobar, Fernando Labbe, and David Laroze
Appl. Opt. 52(25) 6287-6294 (2013)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (9)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (4)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (7)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription