Abstract

We report on the distribution of fluorescence that can be emitted through the surfaces of a ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) slab-shaped high-power solid-state laser. Slab shapes considered include parallel or antiparallel Brewster endfaced slabs and rectangular parallelepiped slabs. We treat cases in which all the faces of these slabs are in air, or with water or another coating on the largest faces. The fraction of the fluorescence emitted through each face, its distribution over that face, and the directions in which it travels are shown to be important to the design of high-power slab lasers.

© 2003 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, E. K. Gustafson, R. L. Byer, “Edge-pumped quasi-three-level slab lasers: design and power scaling,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 36(2), 205–219 (2000).
    [Crossref]
  2. T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, S. Sinha, R. L. Byer, “Yb:YAG and Nd:YAG edge-pumped slab lasers,” Opt. Lett. 26, 986–988 (2001).
    [Crossref]
  3. T. Taira, W. M. Tulloch, R. L. Byer, “Modeling of quasi-three-level lasers and operation of cw Yb:YAG lasers,” Appl. Opt. 36, 1867–1874 (1997).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  4. W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering, 5th ed. (Springer, New York, 1999).
    [Crossref]
  5. R. J. Beach, S. C. Mitchell, H. E. Meissner, O. R. Meissner, W. F. Krupke, J. M. McMahon, W. J. Bennett, D. P. Shepherd, “Continuous-wave and passively Q-switched cladding-pumped planar waveguide lasers,” Opt. Lett. 26, 881–883 (2001).
    [Crossref]
  6. R. J. Beach, “CW theory of quasi-three level end-pumped laser oscillators,” Opt. Commun. 123(1–3), 385–393 (1996).
    [Crossref]
  7. asap is an optical programming language and is produced by Breault Research Organization, 6400 East Grant Road, Suite 350, Tucson, Ariz. 85715.

2001 (2)

2000 (1)

T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, E. K. Gustafson, R. L. Byer, “Edge-pumped quasi-three-level slab lasers: design and power scaling,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 36(2), 205–219 (2000).
[Crossref]

1997 (1)

1996 (1)

R. J. Beach, “CW theory of quasi-three level end-pumped laser oscillators,” Opt. Commun. 123(1–3), 385–393 (1996).
[Crossref]

Beach, R. J.

Bennett, W. J.

Byer, R. L.

Gustafson, E. K.

T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, E. K. Gustafson, R. L. Byer, “Edge-pumped quasi-three-level slab lasers: design and power scaling,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 36(2), 205–219 (2000).
[Crossref]

Koechner, W.

W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering, 5th ed. (Springer, New York, 1999).
[Crossref]

Krupke, W. F.

McMahon, J. M.

Meissner, H. E.

Meissner, O. R.

Mitchell, S. C.

Rutherford, T. S.

T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, S. Sinha, R. L. Byer, “Yb:YAG and Nd:YAG edge-pumped slab lasers,” Opt. Lett. 26, 986–988 (2001).
[Crossref]

T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, E. K. Gustafson, R. L. Byer, “Edge-pumped quasi-three-level slab lasers: design and power scaling,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 36(2), 205–219 (2000).
[Crossref]

Shepherd, D. P.

Sinha, S.

Taira, T.

Tulloch, W. M.

Appl. Opt. (1)

IEEE J. Quantum Electron. (1)

T. S. Rutherford, W. M. Tulloch, E. K. Gustafson, R. L. Byer, “Edge-pumped quasi-three-level slab lasers: design and power scaling,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 36(2), 205–219 (2000).
[Crossref]

Opt. Commun. (1)

R. J. Beach, “CW theory of quasi-three level end-pumped laser oscillators,” Opt. Commun. 123(1–3), 385–393 (1996).
[Crossref]

Opt. Lett. (2)

Other (2)

W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering, 5th ed. (Springer, New York, 1999).
[Crossref]

asap is an optical programming language and is produced by Breault Research Organization, 6400 East Grant Road, Suite 350, Tucson, Ariz. 85715.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Plane inside an ideal rectangular parallelepiped-shaped slab with index of refraction greater than 1.33 in air. The heavy rectangle is the outline of the slab, the black circle is an emitter inside the slab, the solid arrows indicate rays of light that can exit the slab, and the dotted arrows indicate a ray that would be trapped in such a slab.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Percent of total fluorescence that exits a slab with parallel Brewster angle endfaces through the two largest faces as a function of index of refraction of the coating on these faces. We assumed that cooling water is on the outside of the coating.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

(a) Slab having parallel Brewster angle endfaces. Coordinate axes are defined. Area 2 is shaded. (b) Calculated normalized fluorescence intensity profile exiting either large face of a slab with parallel Brewster angle endfaces as a function of z in any plane defined by x = constant between -w/2 and w/2 where w is the width of the slab.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

(a) Slab having antiparallel Brewster angle endfaces. Coordinate axes are defined for each of the two large faces. Areas 1 and 3 are shaded. (b) Calculated normalized fluorescence intensity profile exiting the larger of the two large faces of a slab with antiparallel Brewster angle endfaces as a function of z′ in any plane defined by x = constant between -w/2 and w/2 where w is the width of the slab. (c) Calculated normalized fluorescence intensity profile exiting the smaller of the two large faces of a slab with antiparallel Brewster angle endfaces as a function of z in any plane defined by x′ = constant between -w/2 and w/2 where w is the width of the slab.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

(a) Some possible directions in which fluorescence can travel when exiting a large face of a rectangular parallelepiped-shaped slab near an edge. (b) Some possible directions in which fluorescence can travel when exiting the edge face of a rectangular parallelepiped-shaped slab. (c) Some possible directions in which fluorescence can travel when exiting the large face of a slab having parallel Brewster angle endfaces in the region identified as area 2 in Fig. 3(a). (d) Some possible directions in which fluorescence can travel when exiting a Brewster angle face of a slab having parallel Brewster angle endfaces.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

(a) The normalized density of fluorescence directions as a function of angle of propagation in a y, z plane that exits the large face of the slab shown in Fig. 3(a). The angle denoted as 0 deg is a direction parallel to the +y axis. Note the presence of a large part of the fluorescence propagating in directions between 10 and 60 deg. (b) The normalized density of fluorescence directions as a function of angle of propagation in an x, y plane that exits the large face of the slab shown in Fig. 3(a). The angle denoted as 0 deg is a direction parallel to the +y axis. Note the nearly uniform distribution of directions of propagation centered about the direction normal to the surface (e.g., 0 deg). (c) The normalized density of fluorescence directions as a function of angle of propagation in a y, z plane that exits a Brewster angle face of the slab as shown in Fig. 3(a). The angle denoted as 0 deg is a direction parallel to the +z axis. Note the presence of a large part of the fluorescence propagating in directions between -15 and -55 deg.

Tables (2)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Calculated Fractions of Fluorescence Generated Inside a Yb:YAG Slab in Air that Exits the Indicated Faces

Tables Icon

Table 2 Calculated Fractions of Fluorescence Generated Inside a Yb:YAG Slab with the Largest Faces in Cooling Water that Exits the Indicated Faces

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