Abstract

Accurate radiative transfer modeling in the coupled atmosphere-sea system is increasing in importance for the development of advanced remote-sensing applications. Aiming to quantify the uncertainties in the modeling of coastal water radiometric quantities, we performed a closure experiment to intercompare theoretical and experimental data as a function of wavelength λ and water depth z. Specifically, the study focused on above-water downward irradiance E d(λ, 0+) and in-water spectral profiles of upward nadir radiance L u(λ, z), upward irradiance E u(λ, z), downward irradiance E d(λ, z), the E u(λ, z)/L u(λ, z) ratio (the nadir Q factor), and the E u(λ, z)/E d(λ, z) ratio (the irradiance reflectance). The theoretical data were produced with the finite-element method radiative transfer code ingesting in situ atmospheric and marine inherent optical properties. The experimental data were taken from a comprehensive coastal shallow-water data set collected in the northern Adriatic Sea. Under various measurement conditions, differences between theoretical and experimental data for the above-water E d(λ, 0+) and subsurface E d(λ, 0-) as well as for the in-water profiles of the nadir Q factor were generally less than 15%. In contrast, the in-water profiles of L u(λ, z), E d(λ, z), E u(λ, z) and of the irradiance reflectance exhibited larger differences [to approximately 60% for L u(λ, z) and E u(λ, z), 30% for E d(λ, z), and 50% for the irradiance reflectance]. These differences showed a high sensitivity to experimental uncertainties in a few input quantities used for the simulations: the seawater absorption coefficient; the hydrosol phase function backscattering probability; and, mainly for clear water, the bottom reflectance.

© 2003 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (16)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (8)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription