Abstract

Observations of the spectrum of light from thunderstorms indicate that the radiance amplitude of the near-IR portion of the spectrum is often relatively greater in comparison with the amplitude of the radiance of the visible portion of the spectrum than it is in the spectrum of solar radiation at the surface. Observational data suggest that two mechanisms may cause this effect. The first is the reduction in the shorter wavelengths due to selective scattering, and the second is selective reflection from foliage.

© 2002 Optical Society of America

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