Abstract

An optical method to measure time response in scanning spectrophotometers is described. The method is wavelength independent and can be used to check both the raise time and the fall time. The method was applied to a scanning spectrophotometer and the results were compared to those obtained for the same instrument using a kinetic method. The validity of the new method was demonstrated by the fact that the agreement between the results obtained using the two methods was complete.

© 2000 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. J. Millman, C. Halkias, Integrated Electronics, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1972.
  2. The spectrophotometer is a Perkin Elmer, model Lambda 9. This reference is only for identification purposes.
  3. The mechanical shutter is an Uniblitz shutter, model VS 25. This reference is only for identification purposes.
  4. The software package is PECSS, developed by Perkin Elmer. This reference is only for identification purposes.

Halkias, C.

J. Millman, C. Halkias, Integrated Electronics, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1972.

Millman, J.

J. Millman, C. Halkias, Integrated Electronics, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1972.

Other (4)

J. Millman, C. Halkias, Integrated Electronics, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1972.

The spectrophotometer is a Perkin Elmer, model Lambda 9. This reference is only for identification purposes.

The mechanical shutter is an Uniblitz shutter, model VS 25. This reference is only for identification purposes.

The software package is PECSS, developed by Perkin Elmer. This reference is only for identification purposes.

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Figures (5)

Figure 1
Figure 1

Examples of records obtained by opening and closing the shutter while scanning in wavelength at 60 nm/s with two different nominal time constants.

Figure 2
Figure 2

Values of transit times at different bandwidths compared to the one obtained for a 1 nm bandwidth.

Figure 3
Figure 3

Transit time as a function of nominal time constant for different scanning speeds.

Figure 4
Figure 4

Kinetic record from the spectrophotometer when the shutter is opened and closed.

Figure 5
Figure 5

Ratio between transit times obtained by a kinetic method and those obtained by scanning in wavelength for every value of nominal time constant.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Transit Time Values Calculated from Wavelength Scans.

Equations (5)

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Iλ=λ1λ2τλBλRλdλ
λ = λ0+νt-t0
It=νt1t2τνt-t0×Bνt-t0×Rνt-t0dt
t0ttaIt=τ0tattrIt=ftttrIt=τ1
tt=1.5769tn+0.1349

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