Abstract

A new tool with which to monitor the quality (roughness and subsurface damage) of optical surfaces during grinding and polishing, intensity-detecting total internal reflection microscopy (iTIRM), is presented. A general description of the new measurement method is given, followed by a description of the experimental in situ measurement setup. Experimental results of the method are presented that demonstrate that iTIRM can be used either to control the roughness-reduction process during production or to investigate the process itself. The possibility of implementing the method in an optical workshop is discussed.

© 2000 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. P. Temple, “Total internal reflection microscopy: a surface inspection technique,” Appl. Opt. 20, 2656–2664 (1981).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. R. M. van der Bijl, O. W. Fähnle, H. van Brug, “Subsurface damage measurements as a tool for process monitoring,” in Proceedings of ASPE 1999 Annual Meeting (American Society for Precision Engineering, Raleigh, NC, 1999), pp. 606–609.

1981

Fähnle, O. W.

R. M. van der Bijl, O. W. Fähnle, H. van Brug, “Subsurface damage measurements as a tool for process monitoring,” in Proceedings of ASPE 1999 Annual Meeting (American Society for Precision Engineering, Raleigh, NC, 1999), pp. 606–609.

Temple, P.

van Brug, H.

R. M. van der Bijl, O. W. Fähnle, H. van Brug, “Subsurface damage measurements as a tool for process monitoring,” in Proceedings of ASPE 1999 Annual Meeting (American Society for Precision Engineering, Raleigh, NC, 1999), pp. 606–609.

van der Bijl, R. M.

R. M. van der Bijl, O. W. Fähnle, H. van Brug, “Subsurface damage measurements as a tool for process monitoring,” in Proceedings of ASPE 1999 Annual Meeting (American Society for Precision Engineering, Raleigh, NC, 1999), pp. 606–609.

Appl. Opt.

Other

R. M. van der Bijl, O. W. Fähnle, H. van Brug, “Subsurface damage measurements as a tool for process monitoring,” in Proceedings of ASPE 1999 Annual Meeting (American Society for Precision Engineering, Raleigh, NC, 1999), pp. 606–609.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

TIRM compared with iTIRM. In TIRM the scattered light is detected optically at A, and in iTIRM the intensity of the laser beam is measured at B.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Setup of iTIRM measurement system on a polishing machine. The detector is connected to an oscilloscope.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

(A) Polishing machine with the iTIRM measurement system. The laser beam enters the polishing machine from the rear and is reflected by the mirror toward the sample. (B) Top view of the measurement setup.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Intensity of the reflected beam when a previously ground sample (with #400 abrasives) is further ground with #800 abrasives.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Intensity of the reflected beam during the polishing of a previously ground optical flat (#800 abrasives): (A) with a slurry deficit during the polishing process, (B) with a sufficient amount of slurry during the polishing process.

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