Abstract

The relationship between glistening and stereovision is explored. Glistening is defined as the existence of points of light in the field of view of the observer that are observed substantially in only one eye. We define each glistening point to be essentially a point of stereonoise. A theory of the probability of glistening is developed and shows that a threshold point for 100% glistening should exist. The results of field experiments are presented.

© 1998 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. M. Minnaert, Light and Color in the Open Air (Dover, New York, 1954), p. 150.
  2. R. Coss, M. Moore, “All that glistens: water connotations in surface finishes,” Ecol. Psychol. 2, 367–380 (1990).
    [CrossRef]
  3. J. J. Koenderink, “Why is snow so bright?” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 9, 643–648 (1992).
    [CrossRef]
  4. S. P. Parker, ed., McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed. (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1994), p. 1350.
  5. M. Born, E. Wolf, Principles of Optics (Pergamon, New York, 1964), p. 383.

1992 (1)

1990 (1)

R. Coss, M. Moore, “All that glistens: water connotations in surface finishes,” Ecol. Psychol. 2, 367–380 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Born, M.

M. Born, E. Wolf, Principles of Optics (Pergamon, New York, 1964), p. 383.

Coss, R.

R. Coss, M. Moore, “All that glistens: water connotations in surface finishes,” Ecol. Psychol. 2, 367–380 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Koenderink, J. J.

Minnaert, M.

M. Minnaert, Light and Color in the Open Air (Dover, New York, 1954), p. 150.

Moore, M.

R. Coss, M. Moore, “All that glistens: water connotations in surface finishes,” Ecol. Psychol. 2, 367–380 (1990).
[CrossRef]

Wolf, E.

M. Born, E. Wolf, Principles of Optics (Pergamon, New York, 1964), p. 383.

Ecol. Psychol. (1)

R. Coss, M. Moore, “All that glistens: water connotations in surface finishes,” Ecol. Psychol. 2, 367–380 (1990).
[CrossRef]

J. Opt. Soc. Am. A (1)

Other (3)

S. P. Parker, ed., McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed. (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1994), p. 1350.

M. Born, E. Wolf, Principles of Optics (Pergamon, New York, 1964), p. 383.

M. Minnaert, Light and Color in the Open Air (Dover, New York, 1954), p. 150.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Glistening plane viewed from the top.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Geometry of illumination by an extended source.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Threshold for 100% glistening, assuming monochromatic point source illumination.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Stereopair photographs showing glistening points.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Time-lapsed sequence of photographs taken at 2-min intervals.

Tables (1)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Selected Phenomena and Objects in which Glistening can be Observed

Equations (4)

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P = 2 e e + L .
P = 2 e e + 2 R   tan θ / 2 ,
R e 2   tan θ / 2 .
θ = 2   tan - 1 S 2 R ,

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