Abstract

The design of a diode-laser sensor to monitor water vapor in high-pressure combustion gases is described. The sensor, which employs a multiple-fixed-wavelength absorption strategy, has the potential to simultaneously monitor the water mole fraction and the temperature and pressure in high-pressure and high-temperature environments. The conventional scanned-wavelength strategy, employed in previous diode-laser sensors, is shown to be ill-suited for high-pressure applications. The application of impact and additive approximations in the modeling of H2O absorption features at high pressures is validated experimentally for number densities as high as 18 amagats. Criteria to select optimum wavelength combinations for the fixed-wavelengths strategy are discussed. Optimum wavelength combinations that meet these criteria are identified for different temperature and pressure ranges of interest to combustion applications. The proposed sensor configuration and a strategy to obtain the baseline (zero absorption intensity) in high-pressure environments are also described. Line-shape models that are appropriate for different temperature and pressure regimes are identified.

© 1997 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (13)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (3)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (15)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription