Abstract

Laser-induced fluorescence techniques have been used successfully for quantitative two-dimensional measurements of nitric oxide. The commonly applied D–X(0, 1) or A–X(0, 0) schemes are restricted to atmospheric-pressure flames and engines driven with gaseous fuels because of strong attenuation of the exciting laser beam by combustion intermediates. The properties of a detection scheme for which excitation in the nitric oxide A–X(0, 2) band was used were investigated. We discuss the advantages of the A–X(0, 2) system (excited at 247.95 nm) based on measurements in laminar premixed methane/air flames at 1–40 bars.

© 1997 Optical Society of America

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