Abstract

We report on tailored reflector design methods that allow the placement of general illumination patterns onto a target plane. The use of a new integral design method based on the edge-ray principle of nonimaging optics gives much more compact reflector shapes by eliminating the need for a gap between the source and the reflector profile. In addition, the reflectivity of the reflector is incorporated as a design parameter. We show the performance of design for constant irradiance on a distant plane, and we show how a leading-edge-ray method may be used to achieve general illumination patterns on nearby targets.

© 1996 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. W. Welford, R. Winston, High Collection Nonimaging Optics (Academic, New York, 1989), Chap. 4.
  2. R. Winston, H. Ries, “Nonimaging reflectors as functionals of desired irradiance,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 10, 1902–1908 (1993).
    [Crossref]
  3. H. Ries, R. Winston, “Tailored edge-ray reflectors for illumination,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1260–1264 (1994).
    [Crossref]
  4. D. Jenkins, R. Winston, “Nonimaging optics for nonuniform brightness distributions,” in Nonimaging Optics: Maximum Efficiency Light Transfer III, R. Winston, ed., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng.2538, 24–29 (1995).

1994 (1)

1993 (1)

Jenkins, D.

D. Jenkins, R. Winston, “Nonimaging optics for nonuniform brightness distributions,” in Nonimaging Optics: Maximum Efficiency Light Transfer III, R. Winston, ed., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng.2538, 24–29 (1995).

Ries, H.

Welford, W.

W. Welford, R. Winston, High Collection Nonimaging Optics (Academic, New York, 1989), Chap. 4.

Winston, R.

H. Ries, R. Winston, “Tailored edge-ray reflectors for illumination,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1260–1264 (1994).
[Crossref]

R. Winston, H. Ries, “Nonimaging reflectors as functionals of desired irradiance,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 10, 1902–1908 (1993).
[Crossref]

W. Welford, R. Winston, High Collection Nonimaging Optics (Academic, New York, 1989), Chap. 4.

D. Jenkins, R. Winston, “Nonimaging optics for nonuniform brightness distributions,” in Nonimaging Optics: Maximum Efficiency Light Transfer III, R. Winston, ed., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng.2538, 24–29 (1995).

J. Opt. Soc. Am. A (2)

Other (2)

D. Jenkins, R. Winston, “Nonimaging optics for nonuniform brightness distributions,” in Nonimaging Optics: Maximum Efficiency Light Transfer III, R. Winston, ed., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng.2538, 24–29 (1995).

W. Welford, R. Winston, High Collection Nonimaging Optics (Academic, New York, 1989), Chap. 4.

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Figures (5)

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

General design of a reflector that uses a leading-edge ray and backward ray tracing to evaluate illuminance.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Edge-ray geometry used to create an involute in region (1) that extracts light efficiently by stopping backreflections onto the source.

Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Far-field design geometry and the projected areas of the source seen directly and by reflection. These areas determine the irradiance.

Fig. 4.
Fig. 4.

Reflector profiles obtained for various integration stopping points of region (2). The profiles are truncated to give an exit aperture that is 10 times the source diameter.

Fig. 5.
Fig. 5.

Illuminator performance of reflectors shown in Fig. 4. Increasing region (2) leads to more uniformity and higher peak power, but less spread of constant irradiance onto the target.

Equations (12)

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d R = R   tan [ ϕ + δ ( R , ϕ ) θ ( R , ϕ ) 2 ] .
X = R   sin  ϕ + tan  θ ( R   cos  ϕ + D ) .
P ( X ) = P ( 0 ) f ( X ) ,
P ( 0 ) P 2 ( X ) / f ( X ) , X > 0 ,
f ( Y ) > P 3 ( Y ) / P ( 0 ) ,
d d X P 3 ( X ) f ( X ) 0 ,
P ( X ) = W ( λ ) θ θ s B ( λ , β ) cos  βdβρ ( λ ) n ( β ) ,
P ( X ) = I [ A s ( θ ) + ρ A r ( θ ) ] cos 2   θ 4 π r D ,
A s ( θ ) = 2 r ,
A r ( θ ) = R   sin ( ϕ + θ ) r .
d [ A s ( θ ) + A r ( θ ) ] cos 2 ( θ ) θ = 0 0.
I = P ( 0 ) X max X max d x = 2 D P ( 0 ) tan   θ max .

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