Abstract

The dispersion characteristic of conventional optical glass types will vary as a function of the wavelength region being considered. In the 1.0 to 1.5 μm region, the dispersion of traditional crown and flint glass types is found to be nearly the same. This results in a unique condition when attempting a lens design solution for this spectral region. A typical example is described here that will be helpful in understanding this phenomenon.

© 1995 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. W. J. Smith, Modern Lens Design, 1st ed, McGraw-Hill, New York, Chap. 21, 393 (1992).

Smith, W. J.

W. J. Smith, Modern Lens Design, 1st ed, McGraw-Hill, New York, Chap. 21, 393 (1992).

Other

W. J. Smith, Modern Lens Design, 1st ed, McGraw-Hill, New York, Chap. 21, 393 (1992).

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Figures (1)

Figure 1
Figure 1

Plot showing the change in v number for conventional crown and flint optical glasses as a function of the central wavelength. The spectral band is held constant at +18%, −14%.

Tables (1)

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Table 1 Refractive index data for glasses in the same lens design, used in the visible portion of the spectrum (top), and in the near IR portion of the spectrum (bottom). Note the change in v number, as shown in the right hand column.

Equations (1)

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v d = ( n d - 1 ) ÷ ( n F - n C )

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