Abstract

Combining a rotating polarizer with an image-processing technique permits the visual identification of the linearly polarized beams present in a field of view. The resulting images show the polarizations in a scene, regardless of the orientation of their electric-field vectors, with simultaneous suppression of unpolarized light.

© 1994 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. F. A. Jenkins, H. E. White, Fundamentals of Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976), Chap. 24, p. 503.
  2. A. C. Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1967), Chap. 50, p. 721.
  3. A. Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1989), Chap. 9, p. 400.
  4. G. R. Martin, “The question of polarization,” Nature (London) 358, 194(1991).
    [CrossRef]
  5. P. S. Hauge, “Survey of methods for the complete determination of a state of polarization,” in Polarized Light: Instruments, Devices, Applications, R. M. Azzam, W. L. Hyde, eds., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 88, 3–10 (1976).

1991

G. R. Martin, “The question of polarization,” Nature (London) 358, 194(1991).
[CrossRef]

Guyton, A. C.

A. C. Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1967), Chap. 50, p. 721.

Hauge, P. S.

P. S. Hauge, “Survey of methods for the complete determination of a state of polarization,” in Polarized Light: Instruments, Devices, Applications, R. M. Azzam, W. L. Hyde, eds., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 88, 3–10 (1976).

Jain, A.

A. Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1989), Chap. 9, p. 400.

Jenkins, F. A.

F. A. Jenkins, H. E. White, Fundamentals of Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976), Chap. 24, p. 503.

Martin, G. R.

G. R. Martin, “The question of polarization,” Nature (London) 358, 194(1991).
[CrossRef]

White, H. E.

F. A. Jenkins, H. E. White, Fundamentals of Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976), Chap. 24, p. 503.

Nature (London)

G. R. Martin, “The question of polarization,” Nature (London) 358, 194(1991).
[CrossRef]

Other

P. S. Hauge, “Survey of methods for the complete determination of a state of polarization,” in Polarized Light: Instruments, Devices, Applications, R. M. Azzam, W. L. Hyde, eds., Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instrum. Eng. 88, 3–10 (1976).

F. A. Jenkins, H. E. White, Fundamentals of Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1976), Chap. 24, p. 503.

A. C. Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology (Saunders, Philadelphia, Pa., 1967), Chap. 50, p. 721.

A. Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1989), Chap. 9, p. 400.

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Figures (2)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

One side of the converter. The polarizer holder, 1, was made from a tube of brass (with a 3-cm inside diameter). It was locked to the inner ring of a ball bearing, 2 (SKF, Spain, Type 16007), which was fixed to an aluminum plate, 3 (117 mm × 80 mm × 5 mm). It has a seat in which the polarizer, 4 (polarizing lens, Aroma, Japan) was bonded with black silicone. The side track for the belt, 5, is shown. The system is pulley driven by a motor mounted behind the plate (not shown). The side surfaces in the optical path were blackened.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Visualization of only plane-polarized, reflected light. With the polarizer rotating at constant speed, images were periodically acquired for every 90° of its motion and subtracted from one another. The absolute value of the subtraction periodically generated the upper image, which shows the polarized light present in the image at a given angle. Unpolarized light from other regions was completely suppressed. Without the rotating polarizer or its motion the resulting image was black. A digitized view of the scene without the polarizer and processing (bottom) is shown.

Equations (2)

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I t = I u + I p cos 2 ( ω t ) ,
I t = [ ( I a - I c ) 2 + ( I b - I d ) 2 ] 1 / 2 ,

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