Abstract

Electronic holography and a swept-frequency dye laser are used with the first-arriving-light method to image an absorbing object through the flesh of a human hand. Holography with living human tissue without the use of high-peak-power lasers is made possible by the high sensitivity of the CCD camera as well as its capability for making a large number of holograms in rapid succession, thus enabling the images to be combined to produce a resultant image with an improved signal-to-noise ratio.

© 1994 Optical Society of America

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