Abstract

A brief historical overview of the atmospheric optical phenomena that appear in works of fine art is presented. It is shown that artists have recorded many features of the color and brightness of the sky and clouds, aerial perspective and visibility effects, and phenomena, including crepuscular rays, rainbows, halos, and coronas. Artistic biases resulting from prevailing styles and societal influences are noted. Attention is drawn to a number of phenomena recorded by artists that have not yet been explained or modeled.

© 1991 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Simulating halos and coronas in their atmospheric environment

Stanley David Gedzelman
Appl. Opt. 47(34) H157-H166 (2008)

Atmospheric optics in the near infrared

Michael Vollmer and Joseph A. Shaw
Appl. Opt. 56(19) G145-G155 (2017)

Possible halo depictions in the prehistoric rock art of Utah

Kenneth Sassen
Appl. Opt. 33(21) 4756-4760 (1994)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription