Abstract

This paper describes and gives some of the results of using a microscope which increases the useful depth of observation of an object in a photograph to many times the focal depth of the lens system being used. The principle of the microscope is that the object is illuminated only on the focal plane while the object is being scanned through that plane. Thus, the out-of-focus parts of the object are always in darkness, and the final photographs show high resolution throughout the depth of scan. The mechanism of scanning is somewhat similar to the Gregory–Donaldson method, whereas the mechanism of illumination is similar to that of the Schmaltz slit. This is the first time that scanning and focal plane illumination have been combined to attain high resolution at great depths. Of course, high-frequency scanning would permit direct observation by eye.

© 1964 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (4)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (10)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription