Abstract

Motion picture photography of very small objects by reflected light at high speed requires a large amount of radiant light flux per unit area. Difficulties are often experienced with temperature-sensitive subjects, such as biological specimens. The required light and heat, besides causing evaporation of liquid, can raise the temperature so that abnormal, unwanted conditions are present. The purpose of this paper is to point out several advantages of the xenon electronic flash system for closeup photography. The heating produced on the subject with xenon flash lamps is less than with continuous lamps for the same photographic result. The advantages of xenon strobe lighting are (1) there is no light on the subject when the motion picture shutter is closed between frames since the lamp is not on; (2) the electronic flash lamp need not operate before the camera is up to speed or after a specified time of operation; (3) the color temperature of a typical xenon lamp is 7000° K resulting in a greater blue-to-red ratio than with tungsten light.

© 1964 Optical Society of America

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