Abstract

A new calibration procedure for phase shift moire interferometry is proposed. The method does not ask for a high precision machined calibration object and makes use only of the moire setup itself. The procedure is fast and fully automatic. The fringe plane distance λ was determined with a precision of 1.3%. We present control measurements on a plane surface and a perfect sphere confirming the value and the precision of λ.

© 1990 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography,” Appl. Opt. 9, 1467–1472 (1970).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. D. M. Meadows, W. O. Johnson, J. B. Allen, “Generation of Surface Contours by Moire Patterns,” Appl. Opt. 9, 942–947 (1970).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography from Its Birth to Practical Application,” Opt. Lasers Eng. 3, 3–13 (1982).
    [CrossRef]
  4. G. T. Reid, Optical Metrology (NATO ASI Series) (Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, 1986).
  5. J. C. Wyant, “Interferometric Optical Metrology: Basic Principles and New Systems,” Laser Focus 18, 65–77 (1982).
  6. K. Andresen, “Das Phasenshiftverfahren zum Moire-Bildaus-wehrtung,” Optik Stuttgart 72, 115–119 (1986).
  7. J. J. J. Dirckx, W. F. Decraemer, G. Dielis, “Phase Shift Method Based on Object Translation for Full Field Automatic 3-D Surface Reconstruction from Moire Topograms,” Appl. Opt. 27, 1164–1169 (1988).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1988 (1)

1986 (1)

K. Andresen, “Das Phasenshiftverfahren zum Moire-Bildaus-wehrtung,” Optik Stuttgart 72, 115–119 (1986).

1982 (2)

H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography from Its Birth to Practical Application,” Opt. Lasers Eng. 3, 3–13 (1982).
[CrossRef]

J. C. Wyant, “Interferometric Optical Metrology: Basic Principles and New Systems,” Laser Focus 18, 65–77 (1982).

1970 (2)

Allen, J. B.

Andresen, K.

K. Andresen, “Das Phasenshiftverfahren zum Moire-Bildaus-wehrtung,” Optik Stuttgart 72, 115–119 (1986).

Decraemer, W. F.

Dielis, G.

Dirckx, J. J. J.

Johnson, W. O.

Meadows, D. M.

Reid, G. T.

G. T. Reid, Optical Metrology (NATO ASI Series) (Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, 1986).

Takasaki, H.

H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography from Its Birth to Practical Application,” Opt. Lasers Eng. 3, 3–13 (1982).
[CrossRef]

H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography,” Appl. Opt. 9, 1467–1472 (1970).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

Wyant, J. C.

J. C. Wyant, “Interferometric Optical Metrology: Basic Principles and New Systems,” Laser Focus 18, 65–77 (1982).

Appl. Opt. (3)

Laser Focus (1)

J. C. Wyant, “Interferometric Optical Metrology: Basic Principles and New Systems,” Laser Focus 18, 65–77 (1982).

Opt. Lasers Eng. (1)

H. Takasaki, “Moire Topography from Its Birth to Practical Application,” Opt. Lasers Eng. 3, 3–13 (1982).
[CrossRef]

Optik Stuttgart (1)

K. Andresen, “Das Phasenshiftverfahren zum Moire-Bildaus-wehrtung,” Optik Stuttgart 72, 115–119 (1986).

Other (1)

G. T. Reid, Optical Metrology (NATO ASI Series) (Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, 1986).

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Experimental apparatus: 1, object; 2, grating; 3, camera; 4, 4′, illuminating fibers; 5, cold light source; 6, object translation stage; 7, stepper motor; 8, grating translation stage; 9, stepper motor; 10, computer interface.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Intensity variation (in arbitrary units) at a given pixel as a function of the distance behind the grating (in micrometers). Each of the three maxima corresponds to a bright fringe plane. The distance between two subsequent maxima determines the fringe plane distance λ.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

The surface profile of a flat plate, positioned at a small angle with the grating, in section with the xy plane. Data presented are from the horizontal line in the center of an image representing the mean of twenty-five surface shape measurements.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Standard deviation for each pixel on the horizontal image center line presented in Fig. 3. The standard deviation does not exceed 1 μm for any pixel, showing that the setup has adequate mechanical stability.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Difference ΔZ between the measured data points from Fig. 3 and the best straight line fitted through these points. The maximum amplitude of the difference is 25 μm.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Cross section of the surface of an almost perfect sphere with radius 25.000 ± 0.0005 mm as measured with our setup. A best fit through the data points gives a radius of 25.2 ± 0.3 mm.

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