Abstract

A new interferometer has been developed which combines aspects of a Michelson interferometer with the storage capabilities of holography. The instrument makes it possible to compare interferometrically beams that are not coherent with one another. The instrument was used to measure fidelity of phase conjugation by common mode rejection of aberrators.

© 1989 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. J. Munch, R. F. Wuerker, M. J. LeFebvre, “Interaction Length for Optical Phase Conjugation by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering: An Experimental Investigation” accepted for publication in Applied Optics.
  2. Zygo Zapp automatic pattern processor developed by Zygo Corp., Middlefield, CT.

LeFebvre, M. J.

J. Munch, R. F. Wuerker, M. J. LeFebvre, “Interaction Length for Optical Phase Conjugation by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering: An Experimental Investigation” accepted for publication in Applied Optics.

Munch, J.

J. Munch, R. F. Wuerker, M. J. LeFebvre, “Interaction Length for Optical Phase Conjugation by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering: An Experimental Investigation” accepted for publication in Applied Optics.

Wuerker, R. F.

J. Munch, R. F. Wuerker, M. J. LeFebvre, “Interaction Length for Optical Phase Conjugation by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering: An Experimental Investigation” accepted for publication in Applied Optics.

Other (2)

J. Munch, R. F. Wuerker, M. J. LeFebvre, “Interaction Length for Optical Phase Conjugation by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering: An Experimental Investigation” accepted for publication in Applied Optics.

Zygo Zapp automatic pattern processor developed by Zygo Corp., Middlefield, CT.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Holographic fidelity diagnostic. A polarizing beam splitter is used to direct part of the output from the laser to a reference mirror or reference SBS cell (A), and the other part to the mirror or SBS cell under test (B). The returns from A and B are directed into the holographic setup (enclosed by dotted lines) where two independent holograms, one from A and one from B are formed superimposed on each other. Carrier fringes for the ease of measurement interpretation can be formed by adding a birefringent wedge. The reference beam for each hologram is spatially filtered, permitting quantitative interpretations of the reconstructions.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

(a) Interferogram of input beam aberrations (aberrator in Fig. 1 was moved to a position upstream from the beam splitter BS1). (b) Reconstructed double hologram producing two interfering beams. The original ruby laser beams producing the holograms were mutually incoherent, being both orthogonally polarized and having a path length difference from the beam splitter, BS1, to mirrors A and B in Fig. 1 greater than the coherence length of the laser. The ruby laser beam quality in this shot was 1.4× diffraction-limited. (c) Zygo Zapp analysis of the interference pattern showing fringe straightness to 0.07-wave peak to valley or 1.7 × 10−2-wave rms. With an input beam quality of 1.4, this demonstrates the common mode rejection of the instrument (0.07 wave added to beam quality = 1.4 results in a beam quality of 1.408).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Sensitivity of the technique for common mode rejection measured by aberration plates at the laser output. These data were taken with finite fringes which cause a small displacement in two interferograms, resulting in small but imperfect common mode rejection.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Examples of interferograms from two phase conjugating cells: (a) interferogram between aberrated and unaberrated phase conjugating beams showing excellent conjugation fidelity (opd <λ/10) with a finite carrier fringe; (b) as (a) without carrier fringes; (c) example of lack of fidelity (possibly due to self-focusing in one cell); (d) aberrator used in (a) and (b).

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