Abstract

Some developments of interest to opticists have been selected by Charles Braun, from NASA Tech Briefs 13, No. 6 ( June 1989). Further information can be obtained by writing to NASA STI Facility Manager, TU Division, P.O. Box 8757, BWI Airport, Baltimore, MD, 21240/9985, citing the identifying number.

© 1989 Optical Society of America

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Figures (10)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Laser pulses timed according to the rotational speed of a rotor electrostatically suspended in a vacuum would mark an angular encoder disk mounted on the lower end of the rotor. The precision of the timing circuitry and the low rotational damping (damping time about 700 years in a high vacuum) would result in highly-precise angular intervals.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Mirror would be attached to an imprecise substrate in a procedure similar to that used to make replica mirrors and gratings.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Filtered image of the word is more easily recognized by an afflicted observer than is the unfiltered image.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

This digital image-processing system would act as an intelligent automatic machine-vision system by processing views from stereoscopic television cameras into 3-D coordinates of a moving object in view.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Monolithic photodiode coupled light-modulator array could be constructed on a silicon substrate by growing InAs/GaAs multiple-quantum-wells over a silicon PIN diode layer. An intermediate GaAs buffer layer would confine lattice-misfit dislocations to the vicinity of the silicon.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Stack of cells on a cooler constitutes a fuel-cell module. Oxygen flows through the upper part of a cell, and hydrogen flows through the lower part.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

In the ultrastable superconducting maser oscillator, the amplitude (and, therefore, the frequency) of oscillations is controlled in response to the condition of the active ruby element at low temperature. In the previous design, the amplitude was stabilized at a point in the transmission line, at room temperature.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Dynamic-range compression is exhibited by measurements of attenuation in photorefractive GaAs.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Hydrogen could be stored in palladium catalysts at one of the candidate sites shown in heavy colored lines.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

Resistance of the film deposited by the experimental fabrication process decreases with decreasing temperature down to 93 K, where it exhibits a sharp transition to zero.

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