Abstract

Faster computing requires not only faster gates and faster interconnections but also a modified architecture. The requirements of such architectures favor an optical implementation. This paper presents a programmable optical processor based on symbolic substitution logic.

© 1988 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. A. Huang, “Parallel Algorithms for Optical Digital Computers,” in Technical Digest, IEEE Tenth International Optical Computing Conference (1983), pp. 13–17.
  2. K.-H. Brenner, A. Huang, N. Streibl, “Digital Optical Computing with Symbolic Substitution,” Appl. Opt. 25, 3054 (1986).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. K.-H. Brenner, “New Implementation of Symbolic Substitution Logic,” Appl. Opt. 25, 3061 (1986).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1986 (2)

Appl. Opt. (2)

Other (1)

A. Huang, “Parallel Algorithms for Optical Digital Computers,” in Technical Digest, IEEE Tenth International Optical Computing Conference (1983), pp. 13–17.

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Figures (8)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Principle of symbolic substitution logic.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Optical setup for performing one substitution rule with polarization coded data.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Several rules can be applied in parallel by splitting the input into several channels, performing the substitution, and combining the results.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Partitioning of the data plane into data and control pixels.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Rules for data transport.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Rules for logic operations.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Rules to select one logic result.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Minimal, functionally programmable module.

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