Abstract

NASA continues in its sponsorship of projects that have uses in many fields as well as in space. Opticists will be interested in the items given in this column, selected from NASA Tech Briefs 11, No. 9 ( Oct. 1987) by Franklin S. Harris Jr. Further information can be obtained by writing to NASA STI Facility, Manager TU Division, P.O. Box 8757, Baltimore, MD 21240-9985, and giving the identifying number.

© 1988 Optical Society of America

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Figures (9)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Simplified flux-gate magnetometer is made in part of commercially available integrated circuits.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Ultrasonic range-measuring system includes four commercially available range finder modules that have been modifed to provide higher range resolution and an increased measurement-repetition rate.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Transparent cathode is fabricated on a GaAs diode so that the diode can be illuminated to generate and control the short-circuit current.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Xenon atoms excited to high energy states in two stages. The doubly excited atoms, which are sensitive to photons in the submillimeter wavelength range, would be further excited by these photons, then ionized and counted.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Computation of the far-field radiation pattern requires the modification of the current previously assumed to be induced on a solid antenna surface; to account for the effects of the mesh.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Laser velocimeter could be modified to provide two velocity ranges by adding a rotatable assembly containing two lenses. In one orientation (top), the beam waists are narrow, and the two beams intersect at a relatively large angle, providing a low velocity range with high spatial resolution. In the reversed orientation (bottom), the beam waists are wider, and the beams intersect at a smaller angle to produce more-widely-spaced fringes in a larger region, thus providing a high velocity range with lower spatial resolution.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Laser beams focused to small spots in the wind tunnel and reference cell induce fluorescence in nitric oxide, a small amount of which is mixed with the main gas flow. The fluorescence radiation depends on the main-gas temperature, pressure, and density and is measured to deduce these quantities.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

Thermal expansion and contraction of the distance between fiber end and the mirror would alter the interference between the light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving an interferometric indication of temperatures.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

Frequency of the crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. The circuit can be made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

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