Abstract

A large number of modes can be supported by multimode fibers. There are applications where higher order modes are preferred. Microbend intensity sensors are good examples. The sensitivity of these sensors is greatly increased if higher order modes are excited. In this work, a simple method to excite higher order modes preferentially is suggested. It consists of thin-film gratings deposited directly onto the fiber end. By controlling the film thickness or transparency of the grating structure, a desired transmission coefficient T(r,φ) is synthesized. The desired mode can be excited preferentially by incident Gaussian beams without the aid of additional optical components. Binary intensity and binary phase gratings have been studied. Numerical investigation reveals that the phase gratings are more effective for the preferential excitation of higher order modes than the intensity gratings. In fact, by using binary phase gratings and in optimal excitation conditions as much as 81.1, 76.9, 74.6, 73.3, and 72.3% of the power in the incoming, linearly polarized, fundamental Gaussian beam can be converted to LP02, LP03, LP04, LP05, and LP06 modes, respectively, excluding Fresnel loss.

© 1988 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article
OSA Recommended Articles
Alignment considerations in extrinsic fiber-optic sensors

A. K. Ghosh and P. K. Paul
Appl. Opt. 36(25) 6256-6263 (1997)

Controlling the optical fiber output beam profile by focused ion beam machining of a phase hologram on fiber tip

Jiho Han, Martin Sparkes, and William O’Neill
Appl. Opt. 54(4) 890-894 (2015)

Focusing and scanning light through a multimode optical fiber using digital phase conjugation

Ioannis N. Papadopoulos, Salma Farahi, Christophe Moser, and Demetri Psaltis
Opt. Express 20(10) 10583-10590 (2012)

References

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Cited By

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Figures (5)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Tables (1)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article tables are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Equations (15)

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Equations are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription

Metrics

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Login to access OSA Member Subscription