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References

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  1. J. G. Duthie, Juris Upatnieks, “Compact Real-Time Coherent Optical Correlators,” Opt. Eng. 23, 007 (1984).
    [CrossRef]
  2. H. K. Liu, J. G. Duthie, “Real-Time Screen Aided Multiple Image Optical Holographic Matched Filter Correlator,” Appl. Opt. 21, 3278 (1982).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968), p. 171.
  4. A. Shulman, Optical Data Processing (Wiley, New York, 1970), p. 549.
  5. J. Gaskill, Linear Systems, Fourier Transforms, and Optics (Wiley, New York, 1978), p. 334.
  6. D. A. Gregory, H. K. Liu, “Large Memory Real-Time Multichannel Multiplexed Pattern Recognition,” Appl. Opt. 23, 4560 (1984).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1984 (2)

J. G. Duthie, Juris Upatnieks, “Compact Real-Time Coherent Optical Correlators,” Opt. Eng. 23, 007 (1984).
[CrossRef]

D. A. Gregory, H. K. Liu, “Large Memory Real-Time Multichannel Multiplexed Pattern Recognition,” Appl. Opt. 23, 4560 (1984).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

1982 (1)

Duthie, J. G.

Gaskill, J.

J. Gaskill, Linear Systems, Fourier Transforms, and Optics (Wiley, New York, 1978), p. 334.

Goodman, J. W.

J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968), p. 171.

Gregory, D. A.

Liu, H. K.

Shulman, A.

A. Shulman, Optical Data Processing (Wiley, New York, 1970), p. 549.

Upatnieks, Juris

J. G. Duthie, Juris Upatnieks, “Compact Real-Time Coherent Optical Correlators,” Opt. Eng. 23, 007 (1984).
[CrossRef]

Appl. Opt. (2)

Opt. Eng. (1)

J. G. Duthie, Juris Upatnieks, “Compact Real-Time Coherent Optical Correlators,” Opt. Eng. 23, 007 (1984).
[CrossRef]

Other (3)

J. W. Goodman, Introduction to Fourier Optics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1968), p. 171.

A. Shulman, Optical Data Processing (Wiley, New York, 1970), p. 549.

J. Gaskill, Linear Systems, Fourier Transforms, and Optics (Wiley, New York, 1978), p. 334.

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Figures (4)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Sketch of the experimental arrangement showing the location of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) and the prefiltering scheme. L1L5 are lenses; S is a Jodon spatial filter; SH is an electronic shutter; M1, M2, M3 are mirrors, BS is a coated beam splitter, P1P4 are polarizers; PH is a pinhole; and F is the holographic film plate.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Optical Fourier transform of the pixel structure of the liquid crystal television. The transform lens used for this photograph had a focal length of 876 mm.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Photograph in He–Ne laser light of a tank model displayed on the liquid crystal television. The image has been prefiltered by the arrangement shown in Fig. 1 using a 1-mm diam pinhole.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

(a) Correlation intensity vs rotation of the input scene. These data show the background intensity due to the structure of the liquid crystal television. This background may be decreased somewhat by using a smaller pinhole in the prefiltering arrangement shown in Fig. 1. A 0.5-mm diam pinhole was used in obtaining the data above. (b) Spatial distribution of the correlation signal as displayed on a standard television monitor. The scene and background signals have been separated. The above data are for the scene correlation only. The input scene for (a) and (b) was a scale model of an M48 tank.

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