Abstract

As a unit magnification imaging device, we investigated a roof mirror lens array. A prototype of the unit magnification imaging device was made in an integrally elongated form by plastic molding. With this prototype, a high resolution imaging device with a F/2 range was attained, which can be employed for both area scanning and line scanning.

© 1985 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. M. Kawazu, Y. Ogura, “Application of Gradient-Index Fiber Arrays to Copying Machines,” Appl. Opt. 19, 1105 (1980).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. R. W. Moorhozen, “Imaging with a Linear Array of Conventional (Nongradient) Lenses, an Alternative to Arrays of Gradient Index Form,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper TuD1.
  3. N. Mikami, Y. Koizumi, “Slit Exposing Apparatus Adapted for Direct Copying to Printing Paper,” Japanese Published Utility Model 48-42176 (1973).
  4. T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Device,” Japanese Open Patent Application 56-117201 etc. (1981).
  5. D. Shogren, “Short Focal Length Optical Scanning System,” U.S. Patent3,912,392 (1975).
  6. P. Day, “Compact Optical Imaging Apparatus,” U.S. Patent4,427,291 (1984).
  7. M. Kawazu, T. Inokuchi, “An Imaging Device Using a Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array and Its Imaging Properties,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1984), paper ThE-E3.
  8. T. Inokuchi, M. Kawazu, “Irradiance Distribution Imaging Device Using A Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper ThE-E4.
  9. T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Properties and Applications of A New Imaging Device Using A Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Conference Digest, ICD-13, (1984), B8-9 paper Tudl.

1980 (1)

Day, P.

P. Day, “Compact Optical Imaging Apparatus,” U.S. Patent4,427,291 (1984).

Inokuchi, T.

T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Properties and Applications of A New Imaging Device Using A Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Conference Digest, ICD-13, (1984), B8-9 paper Tudl.

T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Device,” Japanese Open Patent Application 56-117201 etc. (1981).

M. Kawazu, T. Inokuchi, “An Imaging Device Using a Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array and Its Imaging Properties,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1984), paper ThE-E3.

T. Inokuchi, M. Kawazu, “Irradiance Distribution Imaging Device Using A Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper ThE-E4.

Kawazu, M.

M. Kawazu, Y. Ogura, “Application of Gradient-Index Fiber Arrays to Copying Machines,” Appl. Opt. 19, 1105 (1980).
[CrossRef] [PubMed]

T. Inokuchi, M. Kawazu, “Irradiance Distribution Imaging Device Using A Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper ThE-E4.

M. Kawazu, T. Inokuchi, “An Imaging Device Using a Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array and Its Imaging Properties,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1984), paper ThE-E3.

Koizumi, Y.

N. Mikami, Y. Koizumi, “Slit Exposing Apparatus Adapted for Direct Copying to Printing Paper,” Japanese Published Utility Model 48-42176 (1973).

Mikami, N.

N. Mikami, Y. Koizumi, “Slit Exposing Apparatus Adapted for Direct Copying to Printing Paper,” Japanese Published Utility Model 48-42176 (1973).

Moorhozen, R. W.

R. W. Moorhozen, “Imaging with a Linear Array of Conventional (Nongradient) Lenses, an Alternative to Arrays of Gradient Index Form,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper TuD1.

Ogura, Y.

Shogren, D.

D. Shogren, “Short Focal Length Optical Scanning System,” U.S. Patent3,912,392 (1975).

Appl. Opt. (1)

Other (8)

R. W. Moorhozen, “Imaging with a Linear Array of Conventional (Nongradient) Lenses, an Alternative to Arrays of Gradient Index Form,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper TuD1.

N. Mikami, Y. Koizumi, “Slit Exposing Apparatus Adapted for Direct Copying to Printing Paper,” Japanese Published Utility Model 48-42176 (1973).

T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Device,” Japanese Open Patent Application 56-117201 etc. (1981).

D. Shogren, “Short Focal Length Optical Scanning System,” U.S. Patent3,912,392 (1975).

P. Day, “Compact Optical Imaging Apparatus,” U.S. Patent4,427,291 (1984).

M. Kawazu, T. Inokuchi, “An Imaging Device Using a Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array and Its Imaging Properties,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1984), paper ThE-E3.

T. Inokuchi, M. Kawazu, “Irradiance Distribution Imaging Device Using A Micro Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Technical Digest, Topical Meeting on Gradient Index Optical Imaging Systems (Optical Society of America, Washington, D.C., 1981), paper ThE-E4.

T. Inokuchi, “Imaging Properties and Applications of A New Imaging Device Using A Roof Mirror Lens Array,” in Conference Digest, ICD-13, (1984), B8-9 paper Tudl.

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Figures (29)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Structure of single roof mirror lens and image formation principle: the direction of the ridgeline of the roof mirror is in the X direction, and the Y direction is normal to the X direction.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Basic structure and optical path in the Y direction of RMLA (erect image formation system).

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Basic structure and optical path in the X direction of RMLA (inverted image formation system).

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Overall structure of RMLA and image formation.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Sectional View in X direction of overall structure of RMLA.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Equivalent structure of single-roof mirror lens and design example of RMLA. The shaded area indicates a cross section of an effective image formation area in area scanning.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Synthesis of point image by plurality of lenses. The point image of the object point O(X,Y) is synthesized into an image point P(−X,Y) by a plurality of lens systems.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

MTF characteristics (calculated) in the X direction at each point in the Y direction.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

MTF characteristics (calculated) in the Y direction at each point in the Y direction.

Fig. 10
Fig. 10

MTF characteristics (measured) at 5 lp/mm.

Fig. 11
Fig. 11

Image surface defocused amount and MTF at 5 lp/mm.

Fig. 12
Fig. 12

Conjugate length defocused amount and MTF at 5 lp/mm.

Fig. 13
Fig. 13

Projected image pattern of characters.

Fig. 14
Fig. 14

Formation of synthetic irradiance distribution in RMLA.

Fig. 15
Fig. 15

Effective screen size and position of slit.

Fig. 16
Fig. 16

Slit height and irradiance distribution of single-lens system.

Fig. 17
Fig. 17

Slit height and irradiance distribution of composite lens system.

Fig. 18
Fig. 18

Slit height, irradiance, and irradiance unevenness.

Fig. 19
Fig. 19

Setting of position and width of slit in area scanning. Case 1 shows one end X1 of the slit fixed at a slight height of 2 mm, and the other end X2 of the slit is varied.

Fig. 20
Fig. 20

Setting of position and width of slit in area scanning. Case 2 shows one end X2 of the slit fixed at the effective screen edge, and the other end X1 of the slit is varied.

Fig. 21
Fig. 21

Slit width, irradiance, and irradiance unevenness in the case shown in Fig. 19.

Fig. 22
Fig. 22

Slit width, irradiance, and irradiance unevenness in the case shown in Fig. 20.

Fig. 23
Fig. 23

Measured example of irradiance distribution in line scanning.

Fig. 24
Fig. 24

Measured example of irradiance distribution in area scanning.

Fig. 25
Fig. 25

Prototypes of RMLA unit (top), RMA (middle), and LA (bottom). The LA and RMA are each made in an integrally elongated form by precise plastic molding. The RMLA unit integrally consists of the LA and RMA and has an effective image formation area of 260 mm.

Fig. 26
Fig. 26

Compact scanner.

Fig. 27
Fig. 27

Photoprinter.

Fig. 28
Fig. 28

PPC System

Fig. 29
Fig. 29

EF copying system.

Equations (9)

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H T ( X , Y ) = i = 1 N H i ( X , Y ) ,
T p ( R , S ) = | H p ( R , S ) | = | H T ( X , Y ) × exp [ 2 π i ( R · X + S · Y ) ] d X d Y | = | [ i = l N H i ( X , Y ) ] · exp [ 2 π i ( R · X + S · Y ) ] d X d y | ,
I T ( X , Y ) = i = 1 N I i ( X , Y ) = i = l N V i ( X , Y ) · cos 4 θ i ( X , Y ) ,
I T ( X 0 , Y ) = i = 1 N I i ( X 0 , Y ) = i = 1 N V i ( X 0 , Y ) · cos 4 θ i ( X 0 , Y ) .
Δ I T = I T I T I T max × 100 ( % ) ,
L T ( Y ) = X 1 X 2 I T ( X , Y ) d X = i = 1 N X 1 X 2 I i ( X , Y ) d x .
Δ L T = L T max L T min L T max × 100 ( % ) ,
F e = F o / I T ,
F e ¯ = F o / L T S ,

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