Abstract

Wedge prisms are generally eschewed as an optical component for use in convergent light in a well-corrected optical system because they introduce aberrations in most configurations. Nevertheless, wedge prisms have several properties (aside from dispersion) which make them useful in many applications. First, they can be used to deviate a line of sight by a small angle. Second, they deviate a line of sight without reflection and therefore preserve the image orientation. Third, they can be used to correct the aberration of a tilted beam splitter in convergent light. Fourth, they can be used to tilt, or correct the tilt of, an image plane. In this paper simple formulas are presented for third-order coma and astigmatism of a wedge prism used in converging light. Also, configurations are described in which wedge prisms can be used in converging light without introducing coma or astigmatism. Finally, these formulas are applied to the design of a well-corrected optical system.

© 1985 Optical Society of America

Full Article  |  PDF Article

References

  • View by:
  • |
  • |
  • |

  1. J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
    [CrossRef]
  2. J. L. Rayces, Author, Perkin-Elmer Corp., Appl. Opt. Div.; unpublished notebook (1958).

1975 (1)

J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
[CrossRef]

Jain, P.

J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
[CrossRef]

Mitre, G.

J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
[CrossRef]

Prasad, J.

J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
[CrossRef]

Rayces, J. L.

J. L. Rayces, Author, Perkin-Elmer Corp., Appl. Opt. Div.; unpublished notebook (1958).

Nouv. Rev. Opt. (1)

J. Prasad, G. Mitre, P. Jain, Nouv. Rev. Opt. 6, (6), 345 (1975).
[CrossRef]

Other (1)

J. L. Rayces, Author, Perkin-Elmer Corp., Appl. Opt. Div.; unpublished notebook (1958).

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (9)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Prisms can deviate the LOS by a small angle. A mirror which does this is large and can only be used if the cone angle of the light is small.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Wedge prisms deviate the LOS without changing the image orientation.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Wedge prisms can be used to change the tilt of an image plane.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Aberrations of a thin wedge prism.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Two prisms allow the line of sight to be deviated by 48° while introducing <1/6 wave of aberration at 10 μm.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Line of sight of an F/2.5 cone is deviated by 30° while introducing <1/20 wave of aberration at 10 μm.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Aberrations of a thick wedge prism.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

By wedging a beam splitter used in converging light, either coma or astigmatism can be corrected.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

In one special case a single wedge prism has neither coma nor astigmatism.

Equations (19)

Equations on this page are rendered with MathJax. Learn more.

S 1 = y ( n u i 2 n u i 2 ) ,
S 1 = ( 1 n 2 1 n 2 ) ( n u ) 3 y .
C 1 = S 1 i ¯ i ,
A 1 = S 1 ( i i ¯ ) 2 ,
S = ( n 2 1 n 2 ) u 3 ( y 2 y 1 ) ,
C = ( n 2 1 n 2 ) u 2 ( y 2 i ¯ 2 y 1 i ¯ 1 ) ,
A = ( n 2 1 n 2 ) u ( y 2 i ¯ 2 y 1 i ¯ 1 2 ) ,
S = 0 ,
C = ( n 2 1 n 2 ) u 2 y ( i ¯ 2 i ¯ 1 ) ,
A = ( n 2 1 n 2 ) u y ( i ¯ 2 i ¯ 1 2 ) .
i ¯ 2 i ¯ 1 = n n 1 δ ,
C = n + 1 n u 2 y δ ,
A = n + 1 n u y δ ( i ¯ 1 + i ¯ 2 ) .
C = n + 1 n u 2 y 1 δ + n 2 1 n 3 t u 3 i ¯ 2 ,
A = n + 1 n u y 1 δ ( i ¯ 1 + i ¯ 2 ) + n 2 1 n 3 t u 2 i ¯ 2 2 .
δ = t u i ¯ 2 n 2 y 1 for zero coma ,
δ = ( n 1 ) u t i ¯ 2 2 n 2 y 1 ( i ¯ 1 + i ¯ 2 ) for zero astigmatism .
α = t u θ n 2 y for zero coma ,
α = t u θ 2 n 2 y for zero astigmatism ,

Metrics