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References

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  1. L. Yin, J. Trombka, S. Seltzer, M. Bielefeld, “X-Ray Imaging of Extended Objects Using Nonoverlapping Redundant Array,” Appl. Opt. 22, 2155 (1983).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  2. T. M. Cannon, E. E. Fenimore, “Tomographical Imaging Using Uniformly Redundant Arrays,” Appl. Opt. 18, 1052 (1979).
    [Crossref] [PubMed]
  3. L. T. Chang, “Radionuclide Imaging with Coded Apertures and 3-D Image Reconstruction from Fecal-Plane Tomography,” Ph.D. Thesis, U. Calif., Berkeley (1976).
    [Crossref]
  4. R. G. Simpson, H. H. Barrett, “Coded Aperture Imaging” Imaging for Medicine, Vol. 1S. Nudelman, D. D. Patton, Eds. (Plenum, New York, 1980), pp. 269–274.

1983 (1)

1979 (1)

Barrett, H. H.

R. G. Simpson, H. H. Barrett, “Coded Aperture Imaging” Imaging for Medicine, Vol. 1S. Nudelman, D. D. Patton, Eds. (Plenum, New York, 1980), pp. 269–274.

Bielefeld, M.

Cannon, T. M.

Chang, L. T.

L. T. Chang, “Radionuclide Imaging with Coded Apertures and 3-D Image Reconstruction from Fecal-Plane Tomography,” Ph.D. Thesis, U. Calif., Berkeley (1976).
[Crossref]

Fenimore, E. E.

Seltzer, S.

Simpson, R. G.

R. G. Simpson, H. H. Barrett, “Coded Aperture Imaging” Imaging for Medicine, Vol. 1S. Nudelman, D. D. Patton, Eds. (Plenum, New York, 1980), pp. 269–274.

Trombka, J.

Yin, L.

Appl. Opt. (2)

Other (2)

L. T. Chang, “Radionuclide Imaging with Coded Apertures and 3-D Image Reconstruction from Fecal-Plane Tomography,” Ph.D. Thesis, U. Calif., Berkeley (1976).
[Crossref]

R. G. Simpson, H. H. Barrett, “Coded Aperture Imaging” Imaging for Medicine, Vol. 1S. Nudelman, D. D. Patton, Eds. (Plenum, New York, 1980), pp. 269–274.

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Array of mini-images of an extended object consisting of a square frame and an X located in two different planes, with the X nearer to the camera. Both the square frame and the X were assumed to be uniformly and isotropically emitting with the same intensity per unit area. Photon statistics and geometrical effects due to the finite-size pinholes have been accounted for. Each mini-image had been inverted about its pinhole axis to enable orthoscopic reconstruction.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Two-dimensional photographs of 3-D reconstructions of objects using spherical lenses. The reconstructed objects are in negative form, i.e., dark against a light background. (A) and (B) are reconstructions of a high-contrast stick-figure trigonal pyramid. (C) and (D) are reconstructions of the square frame and X with photon statistics, using the array of mini-images shown in Fig. 1. (A) and (C) are views from the center. (B) and (D) are views from right of center. Because the tip of the pyramid and the X are nearer to the viewer than the triangular base and the square frame, respectively, they appear to shift leftward in (B) and (D) relative to their bases, illustrating horizontal parallax.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Tomographic reconstruction of extended objects with the elimination of out-of-focus backgrounds using Chang’s algorithm. Object one (O1) is a rectangle of area of 50 square units, and O2 is a rectangle of 95 square units. O2 is more intense than O1 and is farther away from the NORA screen. Upper figures show tomograms T1 (left) and T2 (right) obtained by backprojection calculations, including out-of-focus backgrounds. Lower figures show the reconstructed objects, O1 (left) and O2 (right), after background elimination.

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