Abstract

Making small diameter lenses

Small diameter lenses of short radius may be made with great accuracy by making a complete glass sphere. The diameter and therefore the radius can be measured physically with great accuracy; no rolled edge is assured. This is faster than fabricating individual elements.

© 1983 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

1
1

The initial cylinder is obtained by core drilling.

2
2

Diamond core drill is used to roughly shape the spherical blank. While the drill rotates the glass rod is turned by hand into it.

3
3

The sphere is easily prepared for polishing and is polished by using tubes at an even variable angle. The left tube rotates in a lathe chuck and the right tube pushes the sphere into it. By changing the angle of this handheld right tube the ball will rotate of its own accord and at various speeds.

4
4

The glass sphere is shown in the polishing position between the two tubes. The ends of these tubes have been coated with pitch and felt.

5
5

The polished sphere is being core drilled to obtain six lens blanks.

6
6

Two views of the sphere after six core drillings. After breaking the elements off at their bases they are ready to be polished on their plano sides.

7
7

The pencil points to the lens being edged. The convex side is held by vacuum against the tube whose end is turned in place to make the mating surfaces accurate. Wax is applied to affix after the plano surface has been adjusted to run true.

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