Abstract

No abstract available.

Full Article  |  PDF Article

Cited By

OSA participates in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. Citing articles from OSA journals and other participating publishers are listed here.

Alert me when this article is cited.


Figures (7)

1
1

The aspheric curve was calculated and machined at a 40:1 ratio in a brass template.

2
2

A Gorton engraver operating at 40:1 was used to generate the curve. At the far right is a variable dc gear reducer. The stylus riding on the cam is 40× the diameter of the midget diamond cutter. The obvious eccentric causes the follower to slowly migrate the cam.

3
3

The lead pencil points to the curve. Above it is the 0.012-in. diam diamond tool that can be rotated up to 0.080 rpm on an exceedingly fine spindle. Using a final plastic tool an acceptable polish was generated on the curve.

4
4

This photograph was taken looking down on the aspheric surface. The object pointing to it is the end of a very sharp lead pencil.

5
5

This actual photo shows the linear spread of the laser beam.

6
6

This 0.012-in. diam diamond plated tool did the grinding. A similar tool made of plastic charged with ultrafine abrasive was the polisher.

7
7

Final view of the small lens; finished size 1 mm × 1 mm × 12 mm.

Metrics