Abstract

The requirements of the Laser Fusion Program place severe demands on the ability to monitor the important parameters of the laser beams. This has resulted in the development of novel and imaginative methods to provide the various required measurements. The design and implementation of a beam-diagnostics system for the Helios laser fusion facility at Los Alamos are described.

© 1980 Optical Society of America

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  1. Detector is manufactured by GenTec, Inc., Quebec. We have modified it to allow it to drive a 50-Ω load.
  2. Detector is manufactured by Santa Barbara Research Corp., Santa Barbara, Calif. Minor modifications can improve the temporal response to ~200 psec.

Other (2)

Detector is manufactured by GenTec, Inc., Quebec. We have modified it to allow it to drive a 50-Ω load.

Detector is manufactured by Santa Barbara Research Corp., Santa Barbara, Calif. Minor modifications can improve the temporal response to ~200 psec.

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Figures (6)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Plan view showing the disposition of the four double-sided optical tables comprising the diagnostic gallery with respect to the turning mirrors that intercept the reflections from the tilted salt windows at the target chamber. The laser amplifiers are constructed in pairs; amplifiers 1AB and 3AB are approximately 1.5 m higher than amplifiers 2AB and 4AB.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

View of a gallery optical table showing folded telescope and typical component arrangement for routing suitably attenuated and focused beam samples for diagnostics measurements: M = mirror; BS = beam splitter; ED = energy detector; F = focus. (Details are discussed in text.)

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Schematic diagram of the complete beam-diagnostic data acquisition system.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

The total energy measurement scheme. The impedance buffers are essentially built into the detectors themselves.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Temporal regions of the pulse.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Schematic showing how the temporal energy distribution is recorded. It is interesting to note that with certain modifications it was possible to use commercially available equipment for most components.

Equations (1)

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R d T d t 1 ( 1 - T / T c ) ,

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