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Figures (9)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Photocapacitive radiant-energy detector operates effectively at room temperatures. Radiation from the source illuminates the detector at a predetermined constant frequency. The semiconductor substrate is about 200 μm thick, and the relatively thin electrically insulating layer is transparent to the radiant energy. Metallic contacts on the front and back of this variable capacitor form its electrodes. The front electrode is a film thin enough to be transparent to the radiant energy.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

A proposed photocapacitive solar-energy converter focuses incoming sunlight on an oscillating mirror that is motor-driven to wobble at a selected frequency. The reflected light irradiates each of a pair of photocapacitive cells alternately, 180° out of phase. The resistance and capacitance of each cell are modulated to deliver power to its own load circuit.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

An all-glass solar-collector element is assembled from three concentric tubes. The inner delivery tube is typically 1.2-cm o.d., the middle absorber tube is 4.3-cm o.d.; and the outer cover tube is 5.3-cm o.d. Optimum interelement spacing (center-to-center) for most applications is twice the diameter of the cover tube.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Collector efficiency for an eight-element array is plotted vs the inlet/ambient temperature differential divided by the incident flux. Typical efficiency of a nonselective flat-plate collector is shown for comparison.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

A proposed economical, lightweight, solar concentrator consists of a reflective film stretched over parallel tensioned wires. It can be used with or without a tracking drive.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

This two-axis laser scanner deflects and intensity-modulates an argon laser beam to give image resolution comparable to standard TV. The system is optimized for the strong 514.5-nm line, which is within the range of highest sensitivity for many image-recording media, such as nonlinear crystals.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Violet laser uses helium and nitrogen gases at a pressure of several atmospheres. Preionization by a transverse discharge insures that the main discharge is a glow (not an arc) for the proper charge-transfer reaction mechanism.

Fig. 8
Fig. 8

The holographic test setup forms a magnified image of a welded pad on a solar-cell printed-circuit substrate. A continuous argon-laser source is used here; a higher-energy pulsed laser might be used in inspecting welded contacts on large solar-cell arrays.

Fig. 9
Fig. 9

The holographic image of a thermally stressed contact on a solar-cell printed-circuit substrate shows two welded areas. By measuring the fringe shifts between the stressed and unstressed states, the weld at the right was found to have approximately twice the area of that on the left.

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