Abstract

Reflectivity changes and the efficiency of a temporary grating formed on a Ge surface by two beams, which differ in frequency by 26 MHz, are compared with those measured for beams of equal frequency. The results indicate that the observations can be explained by a deterioration in the quality of the grating due to its motion across the surface. The predicted effects due to a phase difference between the intensity pattern and the temperature variation on the surface which it produces were not observed.

© 1980 Optical Society of America

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References

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  1. T. A. Wiggins, A. H. Carrieri, Appl. Opt. 18, 1921 (1979).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. T. A. Wiggins, J. A. Bellay, A. H. Carrieri, Appl. Opt. 17, 526 (1978).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. R. M. Herman, C. L. Chin, E. Young, Appl. Opt. 17, 520 (1978).
    [CrossRef] [PubMed]

1979 (1)

1978 (2)

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Figures (3)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of experimental arrangements. The wheel can rotate in either direction. The positions of the detectors for the weak (W), strong (S), weak reflected (R), and diffracted (D) beams are shown.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Photographs of damage produced on an oxidized copper surface by: A, two beams with a stationary wheel; B, two beams with a rotating wheel; and C, a single beam.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Theoretical predictions for the fractional change in reflectivity as a function of the intensity of the strong beam. The dotted curve is for ωτp = 0. The upper curve is for ωτp = −4, and the lower is for ωτp = +4.

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