Abstract

The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30–31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 μm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film–substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser–matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September–1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

© 1980 Optical Society of America

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Figures (7)

Fig. 1
Fig. 1

Brittle material can be proof-tested to eliminate those parts containing critical flaws. At the expense of sacrificing some of the parts, the reliability of the survivors can be improved significantly. The stress level at which the proof-test is carried out should be determined by consideration of the required reliability and the slow crack growth properties of the material in the use environment. Proof-testing is not addressed in this paper, but it is an important practical consideration in the use of brittle materials.

Fig. 2
Fig. 2

Thresholds for copper surface plastic deformation under pulsed CO2 laser irradiation.

Fig. 3
Fig. 3

Influence of grain size on the refractive index of TiO2 rutile coatings.

Fig. 4
Fig. 4

Absorption (+) and damage (○) data for overcoated (solid line) and nonovercoated (dashed line) high reflectors made using various values of oxygen pressure during the evaporation of the titania layers.

Fig. 5
Fig. 5

Damage threshold vs film thickness at 0.53-μm laser wavelength.

Fig. 6
Fig. 6

Damage threshold of fused silica surfaces as a function of laser pulse length. The solid curve is theory based on Eq. (5) from Milam et al. Data points are also taken from that paper.

Fig. 7
Fig. 7

Track length as a function of the laser beam power.

Tables (2)

Tables Icon

Table 1 Bare surface damage thresholds (J/cm2) for 266 nm

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Table 2 Damage thresholds (J/cm2) for single-layer films (λ/2 at 266 nm) at 266 nm

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